Research has provided evidence that the effects of intergroup contact on prejudice reduction are not limited to the outgroup one has contact with (primary outgroup). Rather, they extend to secondary outgroups uninvolved in the contact situation (secondary transfer effect; Pettigrew, 2009). We aimed to provide the first empirical evidence for the emergence of the secondary transfer effect among children. Majority (Italian) and minority (with an immigrant background) elementary school children were administered a questionnaire including measures of contact with the primary outgroup (minority children for the majority, majority children for the minority), prejudice toward the primary outgroup and toward a dissimilar secondary outgroup (disabled children), and social dominance orientation. Results revealed that among the majority group, contact with the primary outgroup had indirect associations with reduced prejudice toward the secondary outgroup. Specifically, we found evidence for sequential mediation by social dominance orientation and prejudice toward the primary outgroup. No secondary transfer effects emerged among minority group members. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings, arguing for the importance of identifying the core processes driving the secondary transfer effect.

Secondary Transfer Effect among Children: The Role of Social Dominance Orientation and Outgroup Attitudes / Vezzali, Loris; Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio; Stathi, Sofia; Cadamuro, Alessia; Lášticová, Barbara; Andraščiková, Simona. - In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0144-6665. - 57:(2018), pp. 547-566. [10.1111/bjso.12248]

Secondary Transfer Effect among Children: The Role of Social Dominance Orientation and Outgroup Attitudes

Vezzali, Loris;Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio;Stathi, Sofia;Cadamuro, Alessia;
2018

Abstract

Research has provided evidence that the effects of intergroup contact on prejudice reduction are not limited to the outgroup one has contact with (primary outgroup). Rather, they extend to secondary outgroups uninvolved in the contact situation (secondary transfer effect; Pettigrew, 2009). We aimed to provide the first empirical evidence for the emergence of the secondary transfer effect among children. Majority (Italian) and minority (with an immigrant background) elementary school children were administered a questionnaire including measures of contact with the primary outgroup (minority children for the majority, majority children for the minority), prejudice toward the primary outgroup and toward a dissimilar secondary outgroup (disabled children), and social dominance orientation. Results revealed that among the majority group, contact with the primary outgroup had indirect associations with reduced prejudice toward the secondary outgroup. Specifically, we found evidence for sequential mediation by social dominance orientation and prejudice toward the primary outgroup. No secondary transfer effects emerged among minority group members. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings, arguing for the importance of identifying the core processes driving the secondary transfer effect.
24-feb-2018
57
547
566
Secondary Transfer Effect among Children: The Role of Social Dominance Orientation and Outgroup Attitudes / Vezzali, Loris; Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio; Stathi, Sofia; Cadamuro, Alessia; Lášticová, Barbara; Andraščiková, Simona. - In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 0144-6665. - 57:(2018), pp. 547-566. [10.1111/bjso.12248]
Vezzali, Loris; Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio; Stathi, Sofia; Cadamuro, Alessia; Lášticová, Barbara; Andraščiková, Simona
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1155832
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