Edible plants provide the human with hundreds of non-nutritional phytochemicals which are recognized as beneficial, such as isoflavones. Likewise other polyphenols, isoflavones may undergo extensive transformations during passage through human digestive tract, especially in the colon, where members of the complex commensal microbiota are capable to carry out synergistically a broad range of metabolic transformations affecting the fate and the biological activity of phytochemicals. Diverse bacterial species occurring in the large intestine hydrolyze the glucose conjugated forms of isoflavones, releasing the corresponding aglycones, which may undergo further microbial conversions (especially reductions) giving rise to a wide spectrum of isoflavone-derived compounds. The end-products of microbial transformations are subjected to substantial person-to-person variation, reflecting the impact of the colonic microbiota, since intestinal bacteria may greatly increase or compromise the biological activity of dietary isoflavones. In fact, certain reduction products (e.g. S-equol) possess superior antioxidant and estrogen-like activities, while others are precursors for C-ring cleavage and lead to isoflavone degradation. Extensive research has been performed to characterize the intestinal bacteria which are responsible for isoflavones transformations. In particular, many efforts are being carried out to identify single bacteria that convert the major soy isoflavone daidzein into S-equol, in the perspective to enrich soy products with such a valuable isoflavone-derived metabolite. Besides, diverse bacteria which are capable of deglycosylation, demethylation, and various reduction reactions are increasingly being identified. Nonetheless, only bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, which produce β-glucosidase that hydrolyze isoflavone glycosides into the corresponding aglycones, are currently exploited to improve the biological activity of soymilk.

Dietary Isoflavones and Intestinal Microbiota: Metabolism and Transformation into Bioactive Compounds / Rossi, Maddalena; Amaretti, Alberto; Roncaglia, Lucia; Leonardi, Alan; Raimondi, Stefano. - STAMPA. - (2010), pp. 137-161.

Dietary Isoflavones and Intestinal Microbiota: Metabolism and Transformation into Bioactive Compounds

ROSSI, Maddalena;AMARETTI, Alberto;RONCAGLIA, Lucia;LEONARDI, Alan;RAIMONDI, Stefano
2010

Abstract

Edible plants provide the human with hundreds of non-nutritional phytochemicals which are recognized as beneficial, such as isoflavones. Likewise other polyphenols, isoflavones may undergo extensive transformations during passage through human digestive tract, especially in the colon, where members of the complex commensal microbiota are capable to carry out synergistically a broad range of metabolic transformations affecting the fate and the biological activity of phytochemicals. Diverse bacterial species occurring in the large intestine hydrolyze the glucose conjugated forms of isoflavones, releasing the corresponding aglycones, which may undergo further microbial conversions (especially reductions) giving rise to a wide spectrum of isoflavone-derived compounds. The end-products of microbial transformations are subjected to substantial person-to-person variation, reflecting the impact of the colonic microbiota, since intestinal bacteria may greatly increase or compromise the biological activity of dietary isoflavones. In fact, certain reduction products (e.g. S-equol) possess superior antioxidant and estrogen-like activities, while others are precursors for C-ring cleavage and lead to isoflavone degradation. Extensive research has been performed to characterize the intestinal bacteria which are responsible for isoflavones transformations. In particular, many efforts are being carried out to identify single bacteria that convert the major soy isoflavone daidzein into S-equol, in the perspective to enrich soy products with such a valuable isoflavone-derived metabolite. Besides, diverse bacteria which are capable of deglycosylation, demethylation, and various reduction reactions are increasingly being identified. Nonetheless, only bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, which produce β-glucosidase that hydrolyze isoflavone glycosides into the corresponding aglycones, are currently exploited to improve the biological activity of soymilk.
Isoflavones: Biosynthesis, Occurrence and Health Effects
9781612090665
Melanie J. Thompson
STATI UNITI D'AMERICA
Dietary Isoflavones and Intestinal Microbiota: Metabolism and Transformation into Bioactive Compounds / Rossi, Maddalena; Amaretti, Alberto; Roncaglia, Lucia; Leonardi, Alan; Raimondi, Stefano. - STAMPA. - (2010), pp. 137-161.
Rossi, Maddalena; Amaretti, Alberto; Roncaglia, Lucia; Leonardi, Alan; Raimondi, Stefano
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2010 Isoflavones Chapter.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: full text
Tipologia: Versione dell'editore (versione pubblicata)
Dimensione 818.21 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
818.21 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/646199
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact