The high efficiency, reliability and flexibility of modern passenger car Diesel engines makes these power units quite attractive for steady power plants totally or partially running on fuels derived from biomass, in particular on syngas. The engine cost, which is obviously higher than that of current industrial engines, may not be a big obstacle, provided that the re-engineering work is limited and that performance and efficiency are enhanced. The goal of this work is to explore the potential of a current automotive turbocharged Diesel engine running on both Diesel fuel and syngas, by means of a comprehensive experimental investigation focused on the combustion process. The engine is operated at the most typical speed employed in steady power plants (3000 rpm), considering three different loads (50–100–300 Nm/16–31–94 kW). For each operating condition, the syngas rate is progressively increased until it provides a maximum heating power of 85 kW, while contemporarily reducing the amount of injected Diesel oil. Maximum care is applied to guarantee a constant quality of the syngas flow throughout the tests, as well as to maintain the same engine control parameters, in particular the boost pressure. It is found that in-cylinder pressure traces do not change very much, even when drastically reducing the amount of Diesel fuel: this is a very encouraging result, because it demonstrates that there is no need to radically modify the standard stock engine design. Another promising outcome is the slight but consistent enhancement of the engine brake efficiency: the use of syngas not only reduces the consumption of Diesel oil, but it also improves the combustion quality. The authors acknowledge that this study is only a starting basis: further investigation is required to cover all the aspects related to the industrial application of this syngas-Diesel combustion concept, in particular the impact on pollutant emission and on engine durability.

Experimental investigation on a Common Rail Diesel engine partially fuelled by syngas / Rinaldini, Carlo Alberto; Allesina, Giulio; Pedrazzi, Simone; Mattarelli, Enrico; Savioli, Tommaso; Morselli, Nicolo'; Puglia, Marco; Tartarini, Paolo. - In: ENERGY CONVERSION AND MANAGEMENT. - ISSN 0196-8904. - 138:(2017), pp. 526-537. [10.1016/j.enconman.2017.02.034]

Experimental investigation on a Common Rail Diesel engine partially fuelled by syngas

RINALDINI, Carlo Alberto;ALLESINA, GIULIO;PEDRAZZI, Simone;MATTARELLI, Enrico;SAVIOLI, TOMMASO;MORSELLI, NICOLO';PUGLIA, MARCO;TARTARINI, Paolo
2017

Abstract

The high efficiency, reliability and flexibility of modern passenger car Diesel engines makes these power units quite attractive for steady power plants totally or partially running on fuels derived from biomass, in particular on syngas. The engine cost, which is obviously higher than that of current industrial engines, may not be a big obstacle, provided that the re-engineering work is limited and that performance and efficiency are enhanced. The goal of this work is to explore the potential of a current automotive turbocharged Diesel engine running on both Diesel fuel and syngas, by means of a comprehensive experimental investigation focused on the combustion process. The engine is operated at the most typical speed employed in steady power plants (3000 rpm), considering three different loads (50–100–300 Nm/16–31–94 kW). For each operating condition, the syngas rate is progressively increased until it provides a maximum heating power of 85 kW, while contemporarily reducing the amount of injected Diesel oil. Maximum care is applied to guarantee a constant quality of the syngas flow throughout the tests, as well as to maintain the same engine control parameters, in particular the boost pressure. It is found that in-cylinder pressure traces do not change very much, even when drastically reducing the amount of Diesel fuel: this is a very encouraging result, because it demonstrates that there is no need to radically modify the standard stock engine design. Another promising outcome is the slight but consistent enhancement of the engine brake efficiency: the use of syngas not only reduces the consumption of Diesel oil, but it also improves the combustion quality. The authors acknowledge that this study is only a starting basis: further investigation is required to cover all the aspects related to the industrial application of this syngas-Diesel combustion concept, in particular the impact on pollutant emission and on engine durability.
138
526
537
Experimental investigation on a Common Rail Diesel engine partially fuelled by syngas / Rinaldini, Carlo Alberto; Allesina, Giulio; Pedrazzi, Simone; Mattarelli, Enrico; Savioli, Tommaso; Morselli, Nicolo'; Puglia, Marco; Tartarini, Paolo. - In: ENERGY CONVERSION AND MANAGEMENT. - ISSN 0196-8904. - 138:(2017), pp. 526-537. [10.1016/j.enconman.2017.02.034]
Rinaldini, Carlo Alberto; Allesina, Giulio; Pedrazzi, Simone; Mattarelli, Enrico; Savioli, Tommaso; Morselli, Nicolo'; Puglia, Marco; Tartarini, Paolo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1133879
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