Beta-lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii presents one of the greatest challenges to contemporary antimicrobial chemotherapy. Much of this resistance to cephalosporins derives from the expression of the class C β-lactamase enzymes, known as Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADCs). Currently, beta-lactamase inhibitors are structurally similar to beta-lactam substrates and are not effective inactivators of this class C cephalosporinase. Herein, two boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs S02030 and SM23) that are chemically distinct from beta-lactams were designed and tested for inhibition of ADC enzymes. BATSIs SM23 and S02030 bind with high affinity to ADC-7, a chromosomal cephalosporinase from Acinetobacter baumannii (Ki = 21.1 ± 1.9 nM and 44.5 ± 2.2 nM, respectively). The X-ray crystal structures of ADC-7 were determined in both the apo form (1.73 Å resolution) and in complex with S02030 (2.0 Å resolution). In the complex, S02030 makes several canonical interactions: the O1 oxygen of S02030 is bound in the oxyanion hole, and the R1 amide group makes key interactions with conserved residues Asn152 and Gln120. In addition, the carboxylate group of the inhibitor is meant to mimic the C3/C4 carboxylate found in beta-lactams. The C3/C4 carboxylate recognition site in class C enzymes is comprised of Asn346 and Arg349 (AmpCnumbering), and these residues are conserved in ADC-7. Interestingly, in the ADC-7/S02030 complex, the inhibitor carboxylate group is observed to interact with Arg340, a residue that distinguishes ADC-7 from the related class C enzyme AmpC. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that DH driven compounds may be optimized to generate new lead agents. The ADC-7/BATSI complex provides insight into recognition of non-beta-lactam inhibitors by ADC enzymes and offers a starting point for the structure based optimization of this class of novel beta-lactamase inhibitors against a key resistance target.

Biochemical and structural analysis of inhibitors targeting the ADC-7 cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii / R. A., Powers; H. C., Swanson; M. A., Taracila; N. W., Florek; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; R. A., Bonomo; B. J., Wallar. - In: BIOCHEMISTRY. - ISSN 0006-2960. - STAMPA. - 53:(2014), pp. 7670-7679. [10.1021/bi500887n]

Biochemical and structural analysis of inhibitors targeting the ADC-7 cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii

ROMAGNOLI, Chiara;CASELLI, Emilia;PRATI, Fabio;
2014

Abstract

Beta-lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii presents one of the greatest challenges to contemporary antimicrobial chemotherapy. Much of this resistance to cephalosporins derives from the expression of the class C β-lactamase enzymes, known as Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADCs). Currently, beta-lactamase inhibitors are structurally similar to beta-lactam substrates and are not effective inactivators of this class C cephalosporinase. Herein, two boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs S02030 and SM23) that are chemically distinct from beta-lactams were designed and tested for inhibition of ADC enzymes. BATSIs SM23 and S02030 bind with high affinity to ADC-7, a chromosomal cephalosporinase from Acinetobacter baumannii (Ki = 21.1 ± 1.9 nM and 44.5 ± 2.2 nM, respectively). The X-ray crystal structures of ADC-7 were determined in both the apo form (1.73 Å resolution) and in complex with S02030 (2.0 Å resolution). In the complex, S02030 makes several canonical interactions: the O1 oxygen of S02030 is bound in the oxyanion hole, and the R1 amide group makes key interactions with conserved residues Asn152 and Gln120. In addition, the carboxylate group of the inhibitor is meant to mimic the C3/C4 carboxylate found in beta-lactams. The C3/C4 carboxylate recognition site in class C enzymes is comprised of Asn346 and Arg349 (AmpCnumbering), and these residues are conserved in ADC-7. Interestingly, in the ADC-7/S02030 complex, the inhibitor carboxylate group is observed to interact with Arg340, a residue that distinguishes ADC-7 from the related class C enzyme AmpC. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that DH driven compounds may be optimized to generate new lead agents. The ADC-7/BATSI complex provides insight into recognition of non-beta-lactam inhibitors by ADC enzymes and offers a starting point for the structure based optimization of this class of novel beta-lactamase inhibitors against a key resistance target.
2014
53
7670
7679
Biochemical and structural analysis of inhibitors targeting the ADC-7 cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii / R. A., Powers; H. C., Swanson; M. A., Taracila; N. W., Florek; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; R. A., Bonomo; B. J., Wallar. - In: BIOCHEMISTRY. - ISSN 0006-2960. - STAMPA. - 53:(2014), pp. 7670-7679. [10.1021/bi500887n]
R. A., Powers; H. C., Swanson; M. A., Taracila; N. W., Florek; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; R. A., Bonomo; B. J., Wallar
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1049714
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