The history of mathematics can enter classroom activity also by investigating copies of ancient instruments, reconstructed on the basis of historical sources. In some Museums of the History of Science there are beautiful collections of original instruments. Just to quote a couple of them in different parts of the world, we may refer to the Museo di Storia della Scienza, in Florence (Italy), to the Hilbert Raum of the Mathematics Institute in Goettingen (Germany) and to the Emperor Collection, stored in the Palace Museum of the Forbidden City in Beijing (China). Yet, because of the delicacy of those precious artefacts, visitors are not usually allowed to touch them. Hence an important part of the experience, namely the visual tactile feedback while handling the instrument, is not accessible to teachers and students. It would be really more useful to have rough yet working copies of them in the classroom. This is not an easy matter, especially for complex ones, but some specimens representative of important class of instruments could be built by teachers or students themselves.In this paper some examples of activity with working reconstruction of ancient instruments are reviewed.

Ancient Instruments in the modern Classroom / Bartolini, Maria Giuseppina. - STAMPA. - 6:(2000), pp. 343-351.

Ancient Instruments in the modern Classroom

BARTOLINI, Maria Giuseppina
2000

Abstract

The history of mathematics can enter classroom activity also by investigating copies of ancient instruments, reconstructed on the basis of historical sources. In some Museums of the History of Science there are beautiful collections of original instruments. Just to quote a couple of them in different parts of the world, we may refer to the Museo di Storia della Scienza, in Florence (Italy), to the Hilbert Raum of the Mathematics Institute in Goettingen (Germany) and to the Emperor Collection, stored in the Palace Museum of the Forbidden City in Beijing (China). Yet, because of the delicacy of those precious artefacts, visitors are not usually allowed to touch them. Hence an important part of the experience, namely the visual tactile feedback while handling the instrument, is not accessible to teachers and students. It would be really more useful to have rough yet working copies of them in the classroom. This is not an easy matter, especially for complex ones, but some specimens representative of important class of instruments could be built by teachers or students themselves.In this paper some examples of activity with working reconstruction of ancient instruments are reviewed.
History in Mathematics Education: The ICMI Study,
9780792363996
Kluwer Academic publisher
PAESI BASSI
Ancient Instruments in the modern Classroom / Bartolini, Maria Giuseppina. - STAMPA. - 6:(2000), pp. 343-351.
Bartolini, Maria Giuseppina
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/461047
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact