IntroductionAdolescent exposure to neurotoxic metals adversely impacts cognitive, motor, and behavioral development. Few studies have addressed the underlying brain mechanisms of these metal-associated developmental outcomes. Furthermore, metal exposure occurs as a mixture, yet previous studies most often consider impacts of each metal individually. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the relationship between exposure to neurotoxic metals and topological brain metrics in adolescents. MethodsIn 193 participants (53% females, ages: 15-25 years) enrolled in the Public Health Impact of Metals Exposure (PHIME) study, we measured concentrations of four metals (manganese, lead, copper, and chromium) in multiple biological media (blood, urine, hair, and saliva) and acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using graph theory metrics, we computed global and local efficiency (global:GE; local:LE) in 111 brain areas (Harvard Oxford Atlas). We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression models to examine association between metal mixtures and each graph metric (GE or LE), adjusted for sex and age. ResultsWe observed significant negative associations between the metal mixture and GE and LE [beta GE = -0.076, 95% CI (-0.122, -0.031); beta LE= -0.051, 95% CI (-0.095, -0.006)]. Lead and chromium measured in blood contributed most to this association for GE, while chromium measured in hair contributed the most for LE. DiscussionOur results suggest that exposure to this metal mixture during adolescence reduces the efficiency of integrating information in brain networks at both local and global levels, informing potential neural mechanisms underlying the developmental toxicity of metals. Results further suggest these associations are due to combined joint effects to different metals, rather than to a single metal.

Topological network properties of resting-state functional connectivity patterns are associated with metal mixture exposure in adolescents / Invernizzi, Azzurra; Rechtman, Elza; Oluyemi, Kristie; Renzetti, Stefano; Curtin, Paul; Colicino, Elena; Ambrosi, Claudia; Mascaro, Lorella; Patrono, Alessandra; Corbo, Daniele; Cagna, Giuseppa; Gasparotti, Roberto; Reichenberg, Abraham; Tang, Cheuk Y; Smith, Donald R; Placidi, Donatella; Lucchini, Roberto G; Wright, Robert O; Horton, Megan K. - In: FRONTIERS IN NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 1662-4548. - 17:(2023), pp. 1098441-N/A. [10.3389/fnins.2023.1098441]

Topological network properties of resting-state functional connectivity patterns are associated with metal mixture exposure in adolescents

Lucchini, Roberto G;
2023

Abstract

IntroductionAdolescent exposure to neurotoxic metals adversely impacts cognitive, motor, and behavioral development. Few studies have addressed the underlying brain mechanisms of these metal-associated developmental outcomes. Furthermore, metal exposure occurs as a mixture, yet previous studies most often consider impacts of each metal individually. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the relationship between exposure to neurotoxic metals and topological brain metrics in adolescents. MethodsIn 193 participants (53% females, ages: 15-25 years) enrolled in the Public Health Impact of Metals Exposure (PHIME) study, we measured concentrations of four metals (manganese, lead, copper, and chromium) in multiple biological media (blood, urine, hair, and saliva) and acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using graph theory metrics, we computed global and local efficiency (global:GE; local:LE) in 111 brain areas (Harvard Oxford Atlas). We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression models to examine association between metal mixtures and each graph metric (GE or LE), adjusted for sex and age. ResultsWe observed significant negative associations between the metal mixture and GE and LE [beta GE = -0.076, 95% CI (-0.122, -0.031); beta LE= -0.051, 95% CI (-0.095, -0.006)]. Lead and chromium measured in blood contributed most to this association for GE, while chromium measured in hair contributed the most for LE. DiscussionOur results suggest that exposure to this metal mixture during adolescence reduces the efficiency of integrating information in brain networks at both local and global levels, informing potential neural mechanisms underlying the developmental toxicity of metals. Results further suggest these associations are due to combined joint effects to different metals, rather than to a single metal.
2023
17
1098441
N/A
Topological network properties of resting-state functional connectivity patterns are associated with metal mixture exposure in adolescents / Invernizzi, Azzurra; Rechtman, Elza; Oluyemi, Kristie; Renzetti, Stefano; Curtin, Paul; Colicino, Elena; Ambrosi, Claudia; Mascaro, Lorella; Patrono, Alessandra; Corbo, Daniele; Cagna, Giuseppa; Gasparotti, Roberto; Reichenberg, Abraham; Tang, Cheuk Y; Smith, Donald R; Placidi, Donatella; Lucchini, Roberto G; Wright, Robert O; Horton, Megan K. - In: FRONTIERS IN NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 1662-4548. - 17:(2023), pp. 1098441-N/A. [10.3389/fnins.2023.1098441]
Invernizzi, Azzurra; Rechtman, Elza; Oluyemi, Kristie; Renzetti, Stefano; Curtin, Paul; Colicino, Elena; Ambrosi, Claudia; Mascaro, Lorella; Patrono, Alessandra; Corbo, Daniele; Cagna, Giuseppa; Gasparotti, Roberto; Reichenberg, Abraham; Tang, Cheuk Y; Smith, Donald R; Placidi, Donatella; Lucchini, Roberto G; Wright, Robert O; Horton, Megan K
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1318693
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