Several behavioral studies show that semantic content influences reach-to-grasp movement responses. However, not much is known about the influence of motor activation on semantic processing. The present study aimed at filling this gap by examining the influence of pre-activated motor information on a subsequent lexical decision task. Participants were instructed to observe a prime object (e.g., the image of a frying pan) and then judge whether the following target was a known word in the lexicon or not. They were required to make a keypress response to target words describing properties either relevant (e.g., handle) or irrelevant (e.g., ceramic) for action or unrelated to the prime object (e.g., eyelash). Response key could be located on the same side as the depicted action-relevant property of the prime object (i.e., spatially compatible key) or on the opposite side (i.e., spatially incompatible key). Results showed a facilitation in terms of lower percentage errors when the target word was action-relevant (e.g., handle) and there was spatial compatibility between the orientation of the action-relevant component of the prime object and the response. This preliminary finding suggests that the activation of motor information may affect semantic processing. We discuss implications of these results for current theories of action knowledge representation.

Does the Activation of Motor Information Affect Semantic Processing? / Scerrati, E.; Iani, C.; Rubichi, S.. - 9:(2021), pp. 153-166. [10.1007/978-3-030-69823-2_7]

Does the Activation of Motor Information Affect Semantic Processing?

Scerrati E.;Iani C.;Rubichi S.
2021

Abstract

Several behavioral studies show that semantic content influences reach-to-grasp movement responses. However, not much is known about the influence of motor activation on semantic processing. The present study aimed at filling this gap by examining the influence of pre-activated motor information on a subsequent lexical decision task. Participants were instructed to observe a prime object (e.g., the image of a frying pan) and then judge whether the following target was a known word in the lexicon or not. They were required to make a keypress response to target words describing properties either relevant (e.g., handle) or irrelevant (e.g., ceramic) for action or unrelated to the prime object (e.g., eyelash). Response key could be located on the same side as the depicted action-relevant property of the prime object (i.e., spatially compatible key) or on the opposite side (i.e., spatially incompatible key). Results showed a facilitation in terms of lower percentage errors when the target word was action-relevant (e.g., handle) and there was spatial compatibility between the orientation of the action-relevant component of the prime object and the response. This preliminary finding suggests that the activation of motor information may affect semantic processing. We discuss implications of these results for current theories of action knowledge representation.
Language, Cognition, and Mind
978-3-030-69822-5
978-3-030-69823-2
Springer Nature
Does the Activation of Motor Information Affect Semantic Processing? / Scerrati, E.; Iani, C.; Rubichi, S.. - 9:(2021), pp. 153-166. [10.1007/978-3-030-69823-2_7]
Scerrati, E.; Iani, C.; Rubichi, S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1286791
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