Obese women are more likely to have decreased insulin sensitivity and are at increased risk for many adverse pregnancy outcomes. An early lifestyle intervention (LI) may have the potential to reduce the impact of insulin resistance (IR) on perinatal outcomes. We report post hoc analysis of an open-label randomized control trial that includes IR women with body-mass index ≥25 randomly assigned to a LI with a customized low glycemic index diet or to standard care (SC) involving generic counseling about healthy diet and physical activity. Women were evaluated at 16, 20, 28, and 36 weeks of gestation, at which times perinatal outcomes were collected and analyzed. An oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) showed that women in the LI group had lower plasma glucose levels at 120 min at 16–18 weeks of gestation, and at 60 and 120 min at 24–28 weeks. More importantly, these women had a lower rate of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants (p = 0.04). Interestingly, the caloric restriction and low-glycemic index diet did not increase the rate of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) babies in the LI group. A lifestyle intervention started early in pregnancy on overweight and obese women had the potential to restore adequate glucose tolerance and mitigate the detrimental role of IR on neonatal outcomes, especially on fetal growth.

The impact of an early lifestyle intervention on pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of insulin-resistant overweight and obese women / Menichini, D.; Petrella, E.; Dipace, V.; Di Monte, A.; Neri, I.; Facchinetti, F.. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 12:5(2020), pp. 1496-1498. [10.3390/nu12051496]

The impact of an early lifestyle intervention on pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of insulin-resistant overweight and obese women

Menichini D.;Petrella E.;Dipace V.;Di Monte A.;Neri I.;Facchinetti F.
2020

Abstract

Obese women are more likely to have decreased insulin sensitivity and are at increased risk for many adverse pregnancy outcomes. An early lifestyle intervention (LI) may have the potential to reduce the impact of insulin resistance (IR) on perinatal outcomes. We report post hoc analysis of an open-label randomized control trial that includes IR women with body-mass index ≥25 randomly assigned to a LI with a customized low glycemic index diet or to standard care (SC) involving generic counseling about healthy diet and physical activity. Women were evaluated at 16, 20, 28, and 36 weeks of gestation, at which times perinatal outcomes were collected and analyzed. An oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) showed that women in the LI group had lower plasma glucose levels at 120 min at 16–18 weeks of gestation, and at 60 and 120 min at 24–28 weeks. More importantly, these women had a lower rate of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants (p = 0.04). Interestingly, the caloric restriction and low-glycemic index diet did not increase the rate of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) babies in the LI group. A lifestyle intervention started early in pregnancy on overweight and obese women had the potential to restore adequate glucose tolerance and mitigate the detrimental role of IR on neonatal outcomes, especially on fetal growth.
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The impact of an early lifestyle intervention on pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of insulin-resistant overweight and obese women / Menichini, D.; Petrella, E.; Dipace, V.; Di Monte, A.; Neri, I.; Facchinetti, F.. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 12:5(2020), pp. 1496-1498. [10.3390/nu12051496]
Menichini, D.; Petrella, E.; Dipace, V.; Di Monte, A.; Neri, I.; Facchinetti, F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1207974
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