“Close renditions”, i.e. renditions that are very close, if not identical, in form and meaning, to the original utterances, are often considered fundamental in dialogue interpreting. It has been suggested that interpreters should address exhaustively and accurately all pieces of information, including those conveyed with minimal responses. This perspective seems to reflect the “golden standard” that normatively guides interpreters’ training. Drawing from a long period research, here we look at the work of “intercultural mediators” providing interpreting service in healthcare. Our analysis shows that closeness in the meaning and function of single utterances does not necessarily coincide with closeness in their function in the interaction. In order for renditions to be “close”, in their interactional function, to those in the other language, interpreting mediators need to achieve “accurate” coordination work. So “accuracy” in coordination should be looked at as a fundamental activity in dialogue interpreting to achieve translational closeness. Expanded dyadic sequences addressing what is going on and pursued in the interaction, for instance, are often necessary to achieve “close” rendition, but their accurate management can be a very complex accomplishment. We suggest that learning accurate coordination may be a major achievement in healthcare interpreter training.

Are close renditions the golden standard? Some thoughts on translating accurately in healthcare interpreter-mediated interaction / Baraldi, Claudio; Gavioli, Laura. - In: THE INTERPRETER AND TRANSLATOR TRAINER. - ISSN 1750-399X. - STAMPA. - 8:3(2014), pp. 336-353. [10.1080/1750399X.2014.972029]

Are close renditions the golden standard? Some thoughts on translating accurately in healthcare interpreter-mediated interaction

BARALDI, Claudio;GAVIOLI, Laura
2014

Abstract

“Close renditions”, i.e. renditions that are very close, if not identical, in form and meaning, to the original utterances, are often considered fundamental in dialogue interpreting. It has been suggested that interpreters should address exhaustively and accurately all pieces of information, including those conveyed with minimal responses. This perspective seems to reflect the “golden standard” that normatively guides interpreters’ training. Drawing from a long period research, here we look at the work of “intercultural mediators” providing interpreting service in healthcare. Our analysis shows that closeness in the meaning and function of single utterances does not necessarily coincide with closeness in their function in the interaction. In order for renditions to be “close”, in their interactional function, to those in the other language, interpreting mediators need to achieve “accurate” coordination work. So “accuracy” in coordination should be looked at as a fundamental activity in dialogue interpreting to achieve translational closeness. Expanded dyadic sequences addressing what is going on and pursued in the interaction, for instance, are often necessary to achieve “close” rendition, but their accurate management can be a very complex accomplishment. We suggest that learning accurate coordination may be a major achievement in healthcare interpreter training.
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Are close renditions the golden standard? Some thoughts on translating accurately in healthcare interpreter-mediated interaction / Baraldi, Claudio; Gavioli, Laura. - In: THE INTERPRETER AND TRANSLATOR TRAINER. - ISSN 1750-399X. - STAMPA. - 8:3(2014), pp. 336-353. [10.1080/1750399X.2014.972029]
Baraldi, Claudio; Gavioli, Laura
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1059716
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