Grasp with hand and mouth: a kinematic study on healthy subjects. J Neurophysiol 86: 1685–1699, 2001. Neurons involved in grasp preparation with hand and mouth were previously recorded in the premotor cortex of monkey. The aim of the present kinematic study was to determine whether a unique planning underlies the act of grasping with hand and mouth in humans as well. In a set of four experiments, healthy subjects reached and grasped with the hand an object of different size while opening the mouth (experiments 1 and 3), or extending the other forearm (experiment 4), or the fingers of the other hand (experiment 5). In a subsequent set of three experiments, subjects grasped an object of different size with the mouth, while opening the fingers of the right hand (experiments 6–8). The initial kinematics of mouth and finger opening, but not of forearm extension, was affected by the size of the grasped object congruently with the size effect on initial grasp kinematics. This effect was due neither to visual presentation of the object, without the successive grasp motor act (experiment 2) nor to synchronism between finger and mouth opening (experiments 3, 7, and 8). In experiment 9 subjects grasped with the right hand an object of different size while pronouncing a syllable printed on the target. Mouth opening and sound production were affected by the grasped object size. The results of the present study are discussed according to the notion that in an action each motor act is prepared before the beginning of the motor sequence. Double grasp preparation can be used for successive motor acts on the same object as, for example, grasping food with the hand and ingesting it after bringing it to the mouth. We speculate that the circuits involved in double grasp preparation might have been the neural substrate where hand motor patterns used as primitive communication signs were transferred to mouth articulation system. This is in accordance with the hypothesis that Broca’s area derives phylogenetically from the monkey premotor area where hand movements are controlled.

Grasp With Hand and Mouth: A Kinematic Study on Healthy Subjects / M., Gentilucci; Benuzzi, Francesca; M., Gangitano; S., Grimaldi. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3077. - STAMPA. - 86:(2001), pp. 1685-1689.

Grasp With Hand and Mouth: A Kinematic Study on Healthy Subjects

BENUZZI, Francesca;
2001

Abstract

Grasp with hand and mouth: a kinematic study on healthy subjects. J Neurophysiol 86: 1685–1699, 2001. Neurons involved in grasp preparation with hand and mouth were previously recorded in the premotor cortex of monkey. The aim of the present kinematic study was to determine whether a unique planning underlies the act of grasping with hand and mouth in humans as well. In a set of four experiments, healthy subjects reached and grasped with the hand an object of different size while opening the mouth (experiments 1 and 3), or extending the other forearm (experiment 4), or the fingers of the other hand (experiment 5). In a subsequent set of three experiments, subjects grasped an object of different size with the mouth, while opening the fingers of the right hand (experiments 6–8). The initial kinematics of mouth and finger opening, but not of forearm extension, was affected by the size of the grasped object congruently with the size effect on initial grasp kinematics. This effect was due neither to visual presentation of the object, without the successive grasp motor act (experiment 2) nor to synchronism between finger and mouth opening (experiments 3, 7, and 8). In experiment 9 subjects grasped with the right hand an object of different size while pronouncing a syllable printed on the target. Mouth opening and sound production were affected by the grasped object size. The results of the present study are discussed according to the notion that in an action each motor act is prepared before the beginning of the motor sequence. Double grasp preparation can be used for successive motor acts on the same object as, for example, grasping food with the hand and ingesting it after bringing it to the mouth. We speculate that the circuits involved in double grasp preparation might have been the neural substrate where hand motor patterns used as primitive communication signs were transferred to mouth articulation system. This is in accordance with the hypothesis that Broca’s area derives phylogenetically from the monkey premotor area where hand movements are controlled.
86
1685
1689
Grasp With Hand and Mouth: A Kinematic Study on Healthy Subjects / M., Gentilucci; Benuzzi, Francesca; M., Gangitano; S., Grimaldi. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3077. - STAMPA. - 86:(2001), pp. 1685-1689.
M., Gentilucci; Benuzzi, Francesca; M., Gangitano; S., Grimaldi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/847491
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