Hillslope stability depends strongly on local conditions, such as lithology and rock strength, degree of saturation, and critical slope angle. Common triggers for slope failure include severe storms, earthquakes, and removal of material from the toe of the hillslope. In this paper, we focus on the latter, in a model in which streams incise the toe and destabilize the hillslope. We investigate possible interactions between migrating knickpoints and hillslope failures in a small-scale, steadily eroding experimental landscape that experiences steady rainfall and base-level fall conditions. We monitored knickpoint propagation and hillslope failure activity with time lapse photography over a time period in which numerous knickpoints migrated through the drainage basin. We then investigated temporal and spatial relationships between hillslope failures and knickpoints and compared these results to Monte Carlo simulations of hillslope failure distributions. When focusing along a single channel, we found that, statistically (significant at the 98% confidence level), a greater number of failures occur downstream from a migrating knickpoint. These results highlight both the organized and random nature of hillslope and knickpoint interactions.

Knickpoints and hillslope failures: Interactions in a steady state experimental landscape / Bigi, Alessandro; L. E., Hasbargen; A., Montanari; C., Paola. - STAMPA. - Special Paper 398(2006), pp. 295-307. [10.1130/2006.2398(18)]

Knickpoints and hillslope failures: Interactions in a steady state experimental landscape

BIGI, Alessandro;
2006

Abstract

Hillslope stability depends strongly on local conditions, such as lithology and rock strength, degree of saturation, and critical slope angle. Common triggers for slope failure include severe storms, earthquakes, and removal of material from the toe of the hillslope. In this paper, we focus on the latter, in a model in which streams incise the toe and destabilize the hillslope. We investigate possible interactions between migrating knickpoints and hillslope failures in a small-scale, steadily eroding experimental landscape that experiences steady rainfall and base-level fall conditions. We monitored knickpoint propagation and hillslope failure activity with time lapse photography over a time period in which numerous knickpoints migrated through the drainage basin. We then investigated temporal and spatial relationships between hillslope failures and knickpoints and compared these results to Monte Carlo simulations of hillslope failure distributions. When focusing along a single channel, we found that, statistically (significant at the 98% confidence level), a greater number of failures occur downstream from a migrating knickpoint. These results highlight both the organized and random nature of hillslope and knickpoint interactions.
Tectonics, Climate, and Landscape Evolution
STATI UNITI D'AMERICA
Knickpoints and hillslope failures: Interactions in a steady state experimental landscape / Bigi, Alessandro; L. E., Hasbargen; A., Montanari; C., Paola. - STAMPA. - Special Paper 398(2006), pp. 295-307. [10.1130/2006.2398(18)]
Bigi, Alessandro; L. E., Hasbargen; A., Montanari; C., Paola
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/692476
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