Protracted or recurrent pain and inflammation in the early neonatal period may cause long-lasting changes in central neural function. However, more research is necessary to better characterize the long-term behavioral sequelae of such exposure in the neonatal period. Objectives: (1) to study whether timing of postnatal exposure to persistent inflammation alters responsiveness to thermal pain in the adult animal; (2) to assess whether animals experiencing early postnatal chronic inflammation display altered anxiety related behavior; (3) to study the importance of genetic background. Newborn mice (outbred strain, CD1 and F1 hybrid strain, B6C3F1) received an injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) or saline on either postnatal day 1 or 14 (PND1; PND14) into the left hind paw. Pain to radiant heat and anxiety were examined in 12-week-old adult animals. Adult baseline PWL was significantly decreased in CD1 mice exposed to CFA on PND 1 and 14 as compared to their saline treated counterparts. B6C3F1 mice exposed to CFA on PND14 showed markedly reduced baseline PWL compared to the PND14 saline group. Persistent inflammation experienced by B6C3F1 mice on PND1 failed to affect baseline adult thermal responsiveness. Adult mice, CD1 and B6C3F1, displayed low anxiety traits only if they had been exposed to persistent inflammation on PND1 and not on PND14. Our research suggests a role for genetic background in modulating long-term behavioral consequences of neonatal persistent inflammation: the data support the hypothesis that pain experienced very early in life differentially affects adult behavioral and emotional responsiveness in outbred (CD1) and hybrid mice (B6C3F1).

Early neonatal inflammation affects adult pain reactivity and anxiety related traits in mice: genetic background counts / Benatti, Cristina; Alboni, Silvia; Capone, Giacomo; Corsini, Daniela; Caggia, Federica; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio; Blom, Johanna Maria Catharina. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0736-5748. - STAMPA. - 27:7(2009), pp. 661-668. [10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2009.07.009]

Early neonatal inflammation affects adult pain reactivity and anxiety related traits in mice: genetic background counts

BENATTI, Cristina;ALBONI, Silvia;CAPONE, Giacomo;CORSINI, Daniela;CAGGIA, Federica;BRUNELLO, Nicoletta;TASCEDDA, Fabio;BLOM, Johanna Maria Catharina
2009

Abstract

Protracted or recurrent pain and inflammation in the early neonatal period may cause long-lasting changes in central neural function. However, more research is necessary to better characterize the long-term behavioral sequelae of such exposure in the neonatal period. Objectives: (1) to study whether timing of postnatal exposure to persistent inflammation alters responsiveness to thermal pain in the adult animal; (2) to assess whether animals experiencing early postnatal chronic inflammation display altered anxiety related behavior; (3) to study the importance of genetic background. Newborn mice (outbred strain, CD1 and F1 hybrid strain, B6C3F1) received an injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) or saline on either postnatal day 1 or 14 (PND1; PND14) into the left hind paw. Pain to radiant heat and anxiety were examined in 12-week-old adult animals. Adult baseline PWL was significantly decreased in CD1 mice exposed to CFA on PND 1 and 14 as compared to their saline treated counterparts. B6C3F1 mice exposed to CFA on PND14 showed markedly reduced baseline PWL compared to the PND14 saline group. Persistent inflammation experienced by B6C3F1 mice on PND1 failed to affect baseline adult thermal responsiveness. Adult mice, CD1 and B6C3F1, displayed low anxiety traits only if they had been exposed to persistent inflammation on PND1 and not on PND14. Our research suggests a role for genetic background in modulating long-term behavioral consequences of neonatal persistent inflammation: the data support the hypothesis that pain experienced very early in life differentially affects adult behavioral and emotional responsiveness in outbred (CD1) and hybrid mice (B6C3F1).
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Early neonatal inflammation affects adult pain reactivity and anxiety related traits in mice: genetic background counts / Benatti, Cristina; Alboni, Silvia; Capone, Giacomo; Corsini, Daniela; Caggia, Federica; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio; Blom, Johanna Maria Catharina. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0736-5748. - STAMPA. - 27:7(2009), pp. 661-668. [10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2009.07.009]
Benatti, Cristina; Alboni, Silvia; Capone, Giacomo; Corsini, Daniela; Caggia, Federica; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio; Blom, Johanna Maria Catharina
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/635738
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