OBJECTIVES: To evaluate in a group of physicians the relation between burnout, demographic or job characteristics, anxiety, and immune variables. METHODS: Seventy one physicians of all grades were recruited among different departments to a cross sectional survey. The Maslach burnout inventory, scales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and personal accomplishment, the trait scale of anxiety inventory (STAI-Y2), and a questionnaire on personal and professional characteristics were administered. The immune profile included quantitative (number (%) of lymphocytes and subsets) and functional (natural killer cytotoxicity) measures. RESULTS: With a model of stepwise multiple regression analysis, emotional exhaustion was significantly affected by both personal (marital, sex) and job characteristics (qualification, working activity), whereas only patient contact explained a portion of variation in depersonalisation. Furthermore, trait anxiety was found to predict the Maslach burnout inventory scores. After correction for potential confounders, physicians who scored high levels of personal accomplishment showed significantly higher numbers of total lymphocytes, T cells (CD3), T helper cells (CD4), and T suppressor cells (CD8) than those who scored low levels. No other correlation was found between burnout and immune variables. CONCLUSIONS: In our group of relatively young physicians a high degree of personal accomplishment was associated with an increase in the number of peripheral lymphocytes, particularly T subsets. The meaning of this is not clear, although it could be speculated that to evaluate oneself positively, particularly with regard to work with patients in the health services, might help to stimulate the immune system. By contrast, there is no evidence that to work hard, to feel tired from work, and to have a cynical reaction towards patient care is related to immunosuppression.

Relation between immune variables and burnout in a sample of physicians / Bargellini, Annalisa; Barbieri, Alberto; Rovesti, Sergio; R., Vivoli; R., Roncaglia; Borella, Paola. - In: OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 1351-0711. - STAMPA. - 57:(2000), pp. 453-457. [10.1136/oem.57.7.453]

Relation between immune variables and burnout in a sample of physicians

BARGELLINI, Annalisa;BARBIERI, Alberto;ROVESTI, Sergio;BORELLA, Paola
2000-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate in a group of physicians the relation between burnout, demographic or job characteristics, anxiety, and immune variables. METHODS: Seventy one physicians of all grades were recruited among different departments to a cross sectional survey. The Maslach burnout inventory, scales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and personal accomplishment, the trait scale of anxiety inventory (STAI-Y2), and a questionnaire on personal and professional characteristics were administered. The immune profile included quantitative (number (%) of lymphocytes and subsets) and functional (natural killer cytotoxicity) measures. RESULTS: With a model of stepwise multiple regression analysis, emotional exhaustion was significantly affected by both personal (marital, sex) and job characteristics (qualification, working activity), whereas only patient contact explained a portion of variation in depersonalisation. Furthermore, trait anxiety was found to predict the Maslach burnout inventory scores. After correction for potential confounders, physicians who scored high levels of personal accomplishment showed significantly higher numbers of total lymphocytes, T cells (CD3), T helper cells (CD4), and T suppressor cells (CD8) than those who scored low levels. No other correlation was found between burnout and immune variables. CONCLUSIONS: In our group of relatively young physicians a high degree of personal accomplishment was associated with an increase in the number of peripheral lymphocytes, particularly T subsets. The meaning of this is not clear, although it could be speculated that to evaluate oneself positively, particularly with regard to work with patients in the health services, might help to stimulate the immune system. By contrast, there is no evidence that to work hard, to feel tired from work, and to have a cynical reaction towards patient care is related to immunosuppression.
57
453
457
Relation between immune variables and burnout in a sample of physicians / Bargellini, Annalisa; Barbieri, Alberto; Rovesti, Sergio; R., Vivoli; R., Roncaglia; Borella, Paola. - In: OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE. - ISSN 1351-0711. - STAMPA. - 57:(2000), pp. 453-457. [10.1136/oem.57.7.453]
Bargellini, Annalisa; Barbieri, Alberto; Rovesti, Sergio; R., Vivoli; R., Roncaglia; Borella, Paola
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
OEM2000.pdf

Accesso riservato

Tipologia: Versione dell'autore revisionata e accettata per la pubblicazione
Dimensione 145.82 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
145.82 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/618699
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 11
  • Scopus 59
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 47
social impact