Climate change refers to a statistically significant variation in either the mean state of the climate or in its variability, persisting for an extended period, typically decades or longer. Climate change on Earth may be due to natural internal processes or external forcing, or to persistent anthropogenic perturbation of the composition of the atmosphere or of land use. The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that the warming of the climate system is unequivocal. Moreover, there is a high level of confidence that this warming is a result of human activities releasing greenhouse gases to the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural activities. A range of future greenhouse gas emission scenarios are also presented, based on estimates of economic growth, technological development and international cooperation. In all scenarios temperatures continue to rise worldwide, with global mean temperatures averaging plus 2 to 4 °C by the end of the century, accompanied by changes in the amounts and patterns of precipitation. The predicted rate of warming seems to be faster than ever recorded and in particular over the last 2000 years, and also since the Earth was exiting the Little Ice Age. There will also be an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme temperature and precipitation events at any time of the year, regardless of the season.

Landslides and climatic change / Borgatti, L; Soldati, Mauro. - STAMPA. - (2010), pp. 87-95. [10.1017/CBO9780511807527.008]

Landslides and climatic change

SOLDATI, Mauro
2010

Abstract

Climate change refers to a statistically significant variation in either the mean state of the climate or in its variability, persisting for an extended period, typically decades or longer. Climate change on Earth may be due to natural internal processes or external forcing, or to persistent anthropogenic perturbation of the composition of the atmosphere or of land use. The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that the warming of the climate system is unequivocal. Moreover, there is a high level of confidence that this warming is a result of human activities releasing greenhouse gases to the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural activities. A range of future greenhouse gas emission scenarios are also presented, based on estimates of economic growth, technological development and international cooperation. In all scenarios temperatures continue to rise worldwide, with global mean temperatures averaging plus 2 to 4 °C by the end of the century, accompanied by changes in the amounts and patterns of precipitation. The predicted rate of warming seems to be faster than ever recorded and in particular over the last 2000 years, and also since the Earth was exiting the Little Ice Age. There will also be an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme temperature and precipitation events at any time of the year, regardless of the season.
Geomorphological Hazards and Disaster Prevention
9780521769259
Cambridge University Press
REGNO UNITO DI GRAN BRETAGNA
Landslides and climatic change / Borgatti, L; Soldati, Mauro. - STAMPA. - (2010), pp. 87-95. [10.1017/CBO9780511807527.008]
Borgatti, L; Soldati, Mauro
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/611250
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 22
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact