We analyzed the 1986-1997 mortality in a cohort of 2065 residents of an Italian municipality which had been exposed to drinking water with a high content of inorganic selenium over a long period of time, and compared it with mortality in the remainder of the municipal population. Mortality from malignant neoplasms increased [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.42], mainly due to an excess mortality from melanoma and colorectal cancer in both sexes, kidney cancer in men, and lymphoid malignancies in women. Overall cardiovascular mortality changed little (SMR 1.05, 95% CI 0.89-1.23), despite the higher cerebrovascular mortality (SMR 1.43, 95% CI 1.03-1.93). Coronary disease mortality slightly decreased (SMR 0.87,95% CI 0.63-1.16), due to a low mortality among women. We also noted an excess mortality from Parkinson's disease in men and from motor neuron disease in women. Evaluation of these findings is, however, hampered by the lack of information about potential lifestyle confounders, the fact that the exposure could only be characterized by a simple dichotomization, and the inconsistencies of most estimates between the two sexes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Mortality in a population with long-term exposure to inorganic selenium via drinking water / Vinceti, Marco; G., Nacci; Rocchi, Emilio; T., Cassinadri; R., Vivoli; C., Marchesi; Bergomi, Margherita. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY. - ISSN 0895-4356. - STAMPA. - 53(2000), pp. 1062-1068.

Mortality in a population with long-term exposure to inorganic selenium via drinking water

VINCETI, Marco;ROCCHI, Emilio;BERGOMI, Margherita
2000

Abstract

We analyzed the 1986-1997 mortality in a cohort of 2065 residents of an Italian municipality which had been exposed to drinking water with a high content of inorganic selenium over a long period of time, and compared it with mortality in the remainder of the municipal population. Mortality from malignant neoplasms increased [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.42], mainly due to an excess mortality from melanoma and colorectal cancer in both sexes, kidney cancer in men, and lymphoid malignancies in women. Overall cardiovascular mortality changed little (SMR 1.05, 95% CI 0.89-1.23), despite the higher cerebrovascular mortality (SMR 1.43, 95% CI 1.03-1.93). Coronary disease mortality slightly decreased (SMR 0.87,95% CI 0.63-1.16), due to a low mortality among women. We also noted an excess mortality from Parkinson's disease in men and from motor neuron disease in women. Evaluation of these findings is, however, hampered by the lack of information about potential lifestyle confounders, the fact that the exposure could only be characterized by a simple dichotomization, and the inconsistencies of most estimates between the two sexes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
53
1062
1068
Mortality in a population with long-term exposure to inorganic selenium via drinking water / Vinceti, Marco; G., Nacci; Rocchi, Emilio; T., Cassinadri; R., Vivoli; C., Marchesi; Bergomi, Margherita. - In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY. - ISSN 0895-4356. - STAMPA. - 53(2000), pp. 1062-1068.
Vinceti, Marco; G., Nacci; Rocchi, Emilio; T., Cassinadri; R., Vivoli; C., Marchesi; Bergomi, Margherita
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/309628
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