Most living birds exhibit cranial kinesis-movement between the rostrum and braincase-in which force is transferred through the palatal and jugal bars. The palate alone distinguishes the Paleognathae from the Neognathae, with cranial kinesis more developed in neognaths. Most previous palatal studies were based on 2D data and rarely incorporated data from stem birds despite great interest in their kinetic abilities. Here we reconstruct the vomer of the Early Cretaceous stem bird Sapeornis and the troodontid Sinovenator, taxa spanning the dinosaur-bird transition. A 3D shape analysis including these paravians and an extensive sampling of neornithines reveals their strong similarity to paleognaths and indicates that morphological differences in the vomer between paleognaths and neognaths are intimately related to their different kinetic abilities. These results suggest the skull of Mesozoic paravians lacked the kinetic abilities observed in neognaths, a conclusion also supported by our identification of an ectopterygoid in Sapeornis here. We conclude that cranial kinesis evolved relatively late, likely an innovation of the Neognathae, and is linked to the transformation of the vomer. This transformation increased palatal mobility, enabling the evolution of a diversity of kinetic mechanisms and ultimately contributing to the extraordinary evolutionary success of this clade.

Evolution of the vomer and its implications for cranial kinesis in Paraves / H, Hu; Sansalone, G; Wroe, S; Mcdonald, Pg; O'Connor, Jk; Li, Zh; X, Xu; Zhou, Zh. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - 116:39(2019), pp. 19571-19578. [10.1073/pnas.1907754116]

Evolution of the vomer and its implications for cranial kinesis in Paraves

Sansalone G;
2019

Abstract

Most living birds exhibit cranial kinesis-movement between the rostrum and braincase-in which force is transferred through the palatal and jugal bars. The palate alone distinguishes the Paleognathae from the Neognathae, with cranial kinesis more developed in neognaths. Most previous palatal studies were based on 2D data and rarely incorporated data from stem birds despite great interest in their kinetic abilities. Here we reconstruct the vomer of the Early Cretaceous stem bird Sapeornis and the troodontid Sinovenator, taxa spanning the dinosaur-bird transition. A 3D shape analysis including these paravians and an extensive sampling of neornithines reveals their strong similarity to paleognaths and indicates that morphological differences in the vomer between paleognaths and neognaths are intimately related to their different kinetic abilities. These results suggest the skull of Mesozoic paravians lacked the kinetic abilities observed in neognaths, a conclusion also supported by our identification of an ectopterygoid in Sapeornis here. We conclude that cranial kinesis evolved relatively late, likely an innovation of the Neognathae, and is linked to the transformation of the vomer. This transformation increased palatal mobility, enabling the evolution of a diversity of kinetic mechanisms and ultimately contributing to the extraordinary evolutionary success of this clade.
2019
116
39
19571
19578
Evolution of the vomer and its implications for cranial kinesis in Paraves / H, Hu; Sansalone, G; Wroe, S; Mcdonald, Pg; O'Connor, Jk; Li, Zh; X, Xu; Zhou, Zh. - In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. - ISSN 0027-8424. - 116:39(2019), pp. 19571-19578. [10.1073/pnas.1907754116]
H, Hu; Sansalone, G; Wroe, S; Mcdonald, Pg; O'Connor, Jk; Li, Zh; X, Xu; Zhou, Zh
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1318340
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