Late preterm infants (LPIs) represent a significant percentage of all neonates (6–8%), but there are limited published data on their postnatal management. Our aim was to compare the frequency of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and the breastfeeding rate of LPIs born at 35+0–36+6 weeks of gestation who were cared for by initial rooming in strategy rather than directly admitted to the special care unit (SCU) and, eventually, to the NICU. We carried out a retrospective study in the perinatal centers of Careggi University Hospital (CUH) and San Giovanni di Dio Hospital in Florence, Italy, where the first and second strategies were applied, respectively. Main outcomes were LPIs admission rate at SCU/NICU and breastfeeding rate at discharge. We studied 190 LPIs born at SGDH and 240 born at CUH. The admission rate in SCU (81 vs. 43%; P < 0.001) and NICU (20 vs. 10%; P = 0.008) was higher in SGDH than in CUH, as was the exclusive breastfeeding rate (36 vs. 22%; P < 0.001). However, infants who were assisted in rooming-in at CUH and infants with similar clinical characteristics at SGDH had similar mixed (60 vs. 69%) and exclusive (35 vs. 31%) breastfeeding rates. Conclusion: Postnatal assistance of LPIs in rooming-in, eventually followed by admission in SCU/NICU based on their clinical conditions, allowed to safely halve their hospitalization. The assistance of infants in rooming-in did not negatively affect their breastfeeding rate. These results support the possibility of assisting LPIs in rooming-in.What is Known:• Late preterm infants represent a significant percentage of all neonates.• Early rooming-in and breastfeeding is recommended for late preterm infants.What is New:• Postnatal assistance of late preterm infants in rooming-in, followed when necessary by admission in neonatal units based on clinical conditions, allowed to safely avoid about half the number of hospitalizations in comparison with direct admission in neonatal units.• This strategy did not affect breastfeeding rate. Infants who were admitted to SCU/NICU after initial rooming-in had worst breastfeeding rate.

The management of late preterm infants: effects of rooming-in assistance versus direct admission to neonatal care units / Dani, C.; Ciarcia, M.; Miselli, F.; Luzzati, M.; Coviello, C.; Azzarelli, F.; Ferrara, M.; Lori, I.; Pezzati, M.. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. - ISSN 0340-6199. - 181:4(2022), pp. 1643-1649. [10.1007/s00431-021-04337-z]

The management of late preterm infants: effects of rooming-in assistance versus direct admission to neonatal care units

Miselli F.;
2022

Abstract

Late preterm infants (LPIs) represent a significant percentage of all neonates (6–8%), but there are limited published data on their postnatal management. Our aim was to compare the frequency of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and the breastfeeding rate of LPIs born at 35+0–36+6 weeks of gestation who were cared for by initial rooming in strategy rather than directly admitted to the special care unit (SCU) and, eventually, to the NICU. We carried out a retrospective study in the perinatal centers of Careggi University Hospital (CUH) and San Giovanni di Dio Hospital in Florence, Italy, where the first and second strategies were applied, respectively. Main outcomes were LPIs admission rate at SCU/NICU and breastfeeding rate at discharge. We studied 190 LPIs born at SGDH and 240 born at CUH. The admission rate in SCU (81 vs. 43%; P < 0.001) and NICU (20 vs. 10%; P = 0.008) was higher in SGDH than in CUH, as was the exclusive breastfeeding rate (36 vs. 22%; P < 0.001). However, infants who were assisted in rooming-in at CUH and infants with similar clinical characteristics at SGDH had similar mixed (60 vs. 69%) and exclusive (35 vs. 31%) breastfeeding rates. Conclusion: Postnatal assistance of LPIs in rooming-in, eventually followed by admission in SCU/NICU based on their clinical conditions, allowed to safely halve their hospitalization. The assistance of infants in rooming-in did not negatively affect their breastfeeding rate. These results support the possibility of assisting LPIs in rooming-in.What is Known:• Late preterm infants represent a significant percentage of all neonates.• Early rooming-in and breastfeeding is recommended for late preterm infants.What is New:• Postnatal assistance of late preterm infants in rooming-in, followed when necessary by admission in neonatal units based on clinical conditions, allowed to safely avoid about half the number of hospitalizations in comparison with direct admission in neonatal units.• This strategy did not affect breastfeeding rate. Infants who were admitted to SCU/NICU after initial rooming-in had worst breastfeeding rate.
2022
181
4
1643
1649
The management of late preterm infants: effects of rooming-in assistance versus direct admission to neonatal care units / Dani, C.; Ciarcia, M.; Miselli, F.; Luzzati, M.; Coviello, C.; Azzarelli, F.; Ferrara, M.; Lori, I.; Pezzati, M.. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. - ISSN 0340-6199. - 181:4(2022), pp. 1643-1649. [10.1007/s00431-021-04337-z]
Dani, C.; Ciarcia, M.; Miselli, F.; Luzzati, M.; Coviello, C.; Azzarelli, F.; Ferrara, M.; Lori, I.; Pezzati, M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1301068
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