High cost, unpredictable defects and out-of-tolerance rejections in final parts are preventing the complete deployment of Laser-based Powder Bed Fusion (LPBF) on an industrial scale. Repeatability, speed and right-first-time manufacturing require synergistic design approaches. In addition, post-build finishing operations of LPBF parts are the object of increasing attention to avoid the risk of bottlenecks in the machining step. An aluminum component for automotive application was redesigned through topology optimization and Design for Additive Manufacturing. Simulation of the build process allowed to choose the orientation and the support location for potential lowest deformation and residual stresses. Design for Finishing was adopted in order to facilitate the machining operations after additive construction. The optical dimensional check proved a good correspondence with the tolerances predicted by process simulation and confirmed part acceptability. A cost and time comparison versus CNC alone attested to the convenience of LPBF unless single parts had to be produced.

Design for additive manufacturing and for machining in the automotive field / Bassoli, E.; Defanti, S.; Tognoli, E.; Vincenzi, N.; Esposti, L. D.. - In: APPLIED SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-3417. - 11:16(2021), pp. 7559-N/A. [10.3390/app11167559]

Design for additive manufacturing and for machining in the automotive field

Bassoli E.;Defanti S.;Tognoli E.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

High cost, unpredictable defects and out-of-tolerance rejections in final parts are preventing the complete deployment of Laser-based Powder Bed Fusion (LPBF) on an industrial scale. Repeatability, speed and right-first-time manufacturing require synergistic design approaches. In addition, post-build finishing operations of LPBF parts are the object of increasing attention to avoid the risk of bottlenecks in the machining step. An aluminum component for automotive application was redesigned through topology optimization and Design for Additive Manufacturing. Simulation of the build process allowed to choose the orientation and the support location for potential lowest deformation and residual stresses. Design for Finishing was adopted in order to facilitate the machining operations after additive construction. The optical dimensional check proved a good correspondence with the tolerances predicted by process simulation and confirmed part acceptability. A cost and time comparison versus CNC alone attested to the convenience of LPBF unless single parts had to be produced.
11
16
7559
N/A
Design for additive manufacturing and for machining in the automotive field / Bassoli, E.; Defanti, S.; Tognoli, E.; Vincenzi, N.; Esposti, L. D.. - In: APPLIED SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-3417. - 11:16(2021), pp. 7559-N/A. [10.3390/app11167559]
Bassoli, E.; Defanti, S.; Tognoli, E.; Vincenzi, N.; Esposti, L. D.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1286869
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