BACKGROUND AND AIM: Italy was the first European country severely affected by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, especially during the first wave in the North of the country. In particular, Modena is a city of Emilia-Romagna which is a region entirely included in the Po valley, one of European areas characterized by the heaviest air pollution levels due also to its orography. Previous studies yielded at a regional level suggested that higher air pollutant levels may increase both SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality. METHODS: In this study, we further investigated the association between air pollutant exposure and spread of the SARS-CoV-2 using data collected from Modena municipality in the period February 2020-April 2021. We used traffic pollutant levels collected from an urban air quality monitoring station in the period January 2020-January 2021, including particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), benzene, and black carbon (BC). We used a random-effects linear regression model within panel data analysis over the study period and we computed beta correlation coefficients (beta) with 95% confidence interval-CI between mean daily pollutant concentrations and SARS-CoV-2 daily positive cases diagnosed in Modena. RESULTS:We found a positive correlation between all traffic pollutants and SARS-CoV-2 cases, namely for PM10 beta was 1.23 (95%CI 1.00-1.46), lower for NOx (beta=0.66, 95%CI 0.56-0.75), and higher for NO2 (beta=1.95, 95%CI 1.59-2.31), benzene (beta=41.41, 95%CI 36.23-46.59), and BC (beta=5.95, 95%CI 1.19-10.72). CONCLUSIONS:Notwithstanding the limitations of use of aggregated data and potential the residual confounding, these findings seem to support the hypothesis that high levels of air pollution may favor the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection, or alternatively that they reflect a higher mobility and number of social contacts that favor the spread of the infection. KEYWORDS: Air pollution, Traffic-related, Infectious diseases, Environmental epidemiology, Exposure assessment

Association between outdoor traffic air pollutants and spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Modena, Northern Italy / Filippini, Tommaso; Bigi, Alessandro; Teggi, Sergio; Bargellini, Annalisa; Vinceti, Marco. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES. SUPPLEMENTS. - ISSN 1078-0475. - 2021:1(2021), pp. 471-471. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 33rd Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. Promoting Environmental Health and Equity in a Shifting Climate tenutosi a Webinar nel 23-26 August 2021 [10.1289/isee.2021.P-425].

Association between outdoor traffic air pollutants and spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Modena, Northern Italy

Filippini, Tommaso;Bigi, Alessandro;Teggi, Sergio;Bargellini, Annalisa;Vinceti, Marco
2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Italy was the first European country severely affected by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, especially during the first wave in the North of the country. In particular, Modena is a city of Emilia-Romagna which is a region entirely included in the Po valley, one of European areas characterized by the heaviest air pollution levels due also to its orography. Previous studies yielded at a regional level suggested that higher air pollutant levels may increase both SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality. METHODS: In this study, we further investigated the association between air pollutant exposure and spread of the SARS-CoV-2 using data collected from Modena municipality in the period February 2020-April 2021. We used traffic pollutant levels collected from an urban air quality monitoring station in the period January 2020-January 2021, including particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), benzene, and black carbon (BC). We used a random-effects linear regression model within panel data analysis over the study period and we computed beta correlation coefficients (beta) with 95% confidence interval-CI between mean daily pollutant concentrations and SARS-CoV-2 daily positive cases diagnosed in Modena. RESULTS:We found a positive correlation between all traffic pollutants and SARS-CoV-2 cases, namely for PM10 beta was 1.23 (95%CI 1.00-1.46), lower for NOx (beta=0.66, 95%CI 0.56-0.75), and higher for NO2 (beta=1.95, 95%CI 1.59-2.31), benzene (beta=41.41, 95%CI 36.23-46.59), and BC (beta=5.95, 95%CI 1.19-10.72). CONCLUSIONS:Notwithstanding the limitations of use of aggregated data and potential the residual confounding, these findings seem to support the hypothesis that high levels of air pollution may favor the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection, or alternatively that they reflect a higher mobility and number of social contacts that favor the spread of the infection. KEYWORDS: Air pollution, Traffic-related, Infectious diseases, Environmental epidemiology, Exposure assessment
2021
471
471
Filippini, Tommaso; Bigi, Alessandro; Teggi, Sergio; Bargellini, Annalisa; Vinceti, Marco
Association between outdoor traffic air pollutants and spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Modena, Northern Italy / Filippini, Tommaso; Bigi, Alessandro; Teggi, Sergio; Bargellini, Annalisa; Vinceti, Marco. - In: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES. SUPPLEMENTS. - ISSN 1078-0475. - 2021:1(2021), pp. 471-471. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 33rd Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. Promoting Environmental Health and Equity in a Shifting Climate tenutosi a Webinar nel 23-26 August 2021 [10.1289/isee.2021.P-425].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1274538
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