The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify subjects with hyperprolactinemia in a clinical sample of patients; (2) to compare the neurologic, psychiatric, and sleep conditions found in patients subgrouped by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and hyperprolactinemia; and (3) to identify patients with hyperprolactinemia and EDS not supported by the presence of any other neurologic, psychiatric, or sleep disorder, or substance/medication use. A retrospective chart review of inpatients was carried out in order to identify all patients in whom the prolactin (PRL) serum levels were determined. A total of 130 subjects were retrieved: 55 had increased levels of PRL, while the remaining 75 participants had normal PRL levels. EDS was reported by 32 (58.2%) participants with increased PRL and 34 (45.3%) with normal PRL. Obstructive sleep apnea or other sleep or neurologic/psychiatric conditions could explain EDS in all participants with normal PRL. Among subjects with increased PRL, eight had no other neurologic/psychiatric or sleep disorder (or drug) potentially causing EDS; these participants, at polysomnography, had time in bed, sleep period time, and total sleep time longer than those with EDS associated to another condition. These findings can be considered as a preliminary indication of a role of hyperprolactinemia in EDS and represent a basis for future controlled studies able to test this hypothesis in a reliable, objective, and methodologically more appropriate way.

Increased Serum Prolactin and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness: An Attempt of Proof-of-Concept Study / Mogavero, M. P.; Cosentino, F. I. I.; Lanuzza, B.; Tripodi, M.; Lanza, G.; Arico, D.; Delrosso, L. M.; Pizza, F.; Plazzi, G.; Ferri, R.. - In: BRAIN SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-3425. - 11:12(2021), pp. 1-10. [10.3390/BRAINSCI11121574]

Increased Serum Prolactin and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness: An Attempt of Proof-of-Concept Study

Plazzi G.;
2021

Abstract

The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify subjects with hyperprolactinemia in a clinical sample of patients; (2) to compare the neurologic, psychiatric, and sleep conditions found in patients subgrouped by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and hyperprolactinemia; and (3) to identify patients with hyperprolactinemia and EDS not supported by the presence of any other neurologic, psychiatric, or sleep disorder, or substance/medication use. A retrospective chart review of inpatients was carried out in order to identify all patients in whom the prolactin (PRL) serum levels were determined. A total of 130 subjects were retrieved: 55 had increased levels of PRL, while the remaining 75 participants had normal PRL levels. EDS was reported by 32 (58.2%) participants with increased PRL and 34 (45.3%) with normal PRL. Obstructive sleep apnea or other sleep or neurologic/psychiatric conditions could explain EDS in all participants with normal PRL. Among subjects with increased PRL, eight had no other neurologic/psychiatric or sleep disorder (or drug) potentially causing EDS; these participants, at polysomnography, had time in bed, sleep period time, and total sleep time longer than those with EDS associated to another condition. These findings can be considered as a preliminary indication of a role of hyperprolactinemia in EDS and represent a basis for future controlled studies able to test this hypothesis in a reliable, objective, and methodologically more appropriate way.
2021
11
12
1
10
Increased Serum Prolactin and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness: An Attempt of Proof-of-Concept Study / Mogavero, M. P.; Cosentino, F. I. I.; Lanuzza, B.; Tripodi, M.; Lanza, G.; Arico, D.; Delrosso, L. M.; Pizza, F.; Plazzi, G.; Ferri, R.. - In: BRAIN SCIENCES. - ISSN 2076-3425. - 11:12(2021), pp. 1-10. [10.3390/BRAINSCI11121574]
Mogavero, M. P.; Cosentino, F. I. I.; Lanuzza, B.; Tripodi, M.; Lanza, G.; Arico, D.; Delrosso, L. M.; Pizza, F.; Plazzi, G.; Ferri, R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1270981
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