Introduction: A growing number of studies have demonstrated that the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has severely affected sleep and dream activity in healthy people. To date, no investigation has examined dream activity specifically in COVID-19 patients. Methods: As part of the International COVID-19 Sleep Study (ICOSS), we compared 544 COVID-19 participants with 544 matched-controls. A within-subjects comparison between pre-pandemic and pandemic periods computed separately for controls and COVID-19 participants were performed on dream recall and nightmare frequency (DRF; NF). Also, non-parametric comparisons between controls and COVID-19 participants were carried out. Further, we compared psychological measures between the groups collected during pandemic. Ordinal logistic regression to detect the best predictors of NF was performed. Results: We found that people reported greater dream activity during the pandemic. Comparisons between controls and COVID-19 participants revealed a) no difference between groups concerning DRF in the pre-pandemic period and during the pandemic; b) no difference between groups concerning nightmare frequency in the pre-pandemic period; and c) COVID-19 participants reported significantly higher NF than controls during pandemic (p = 0.003). Additionally, we showed that a) anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress-disorder (PTSD) symptom scores were higher in COVID-19 participants than controls; and b) quality of life and health as well as wellbeing (WHO-5) scores were significantly higher in controls than COVID-19 participants. Finally, ordinal logistic regression indicates that DRF (p < 0.001), PTSD (p < 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.018), insomnia (p = 0.039), COVID-19 severity (p = 0.014), sleep duration (p = 0.003) and age (p = 0.001) predicted NF. Discussion: Our work shows strong associations between increased nightmares in those reporting having had COVID-19. This suggests that the more that people were affected by COVID-19, the greater the impact upon dream activity and quality of life.

Nightmares in People with COVID-19: Did Coronavirus Infect Our Dreams? / Scarpelli, S.; Nadorff, M. R.; Bjorvatn, B.; Chung, F.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Espie, C. A.; Inoue, Y.; Matsui, K.; Merikanto, I.; Morin, C. M.; Penzel, T.; Sieminski, M.; Fang, H.; Macedo, T.; Mota-Rolim, S. A.; Leger, D.; Plazzi, G.; Chan, N. Y.; Partinen, M.; Bolstad, C. J.; Holzinger, B.; De Gennaro, L.. - In: NATURE AND SCIENCE OF SLEEP. - ISSN 1179-1608. - 14:(2022), pp. 93-108. [10.2147/NSS.S344299]

Nightmares in People with COVID-19: Did Coronavirus Infect Our Dreams?

Plazzi G.;
2022

Abstract

Introduction: A growing number of studies have demonstrated that the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has severely affected sleep and dream activity in healthy people. To date, no investigation has examined dream activity specifically in COVID-19 patients. Methods: As part of the International COVID-19 Sleep Study (ICOSS), we compared 544 COVID-19 participants with 544 matched-controls. A within-subjects comparison between pre-pandemic and pandemic periods computed separately for controls and COVID-19 participants were performed on dream recall and nightmare frequency (DRF; NF). Also, non-parametric comparisons between controls and COVID-19 participants were carried out. Further, we compared psychological measures between the groups collected during pandemic. Ordinal logistic regression to detect the best predictors of NF was performed. Results: We found that people reported greater dream activity during the pandemic. Comparisons between controls and COVID-19 participants revealed a) no difference between groups concerning DRF in the pre-pandemic period and during the pandemic; b) no difference between groups concerning nightmare frequency in the pre-pandemic period; and c) COVID-19 participants reported significantly higher NF than controls during pandemic (p = 0.003). Additionally, we showed that a) anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress-disorder (PTSD) symptom scores were higher in COVID-19 participants than controls; and b) quality of life and health as well as wellbeing (WHO-5) scores were significantly higher in controls than COVID-19 participants. Finally, ordinal logistic regression indicates that DRF (p < 0.001), PTSD (p < 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.018), insomnia (p = 0.039), COVID-19 severity (p = 0.014), sleep duration (p = 0.003) and age (p = 0.001) predicted NF. Discussion: Our work shows strong associations between increased nightmares in those reporting having had COVID-19. This suggests that the more that people were affected by COVID-19, the greater the impact upon dream activity and quality of life.
2022
14
93
108
Nightmares in People with COVID-19: Did Coronavirus Infect Our Dreams? / Scarpelli, S.; Nadorff, M. R.; Bjorvatn, B.; Chung, F.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Espie, C. A.; Inoue, Y.; Matsui, K.; Merikanto, I.; Morin, C. M.; Penzel, T.; Sieminski, M.; Fang, H.; Macedo, T.; Mota-Rolim, S. A.; Leger, D.; Plazzi, G.; Chan, N. Y.; Partinen, M.; Bolstad, C. J.; Holzinger, B.; De Gennaro, L.. - In: NATURE AND SCIENCE OF SLEEP. - ISSN 1179-1608. - 14:(2022), pp. 93-108. [10.2147/NSS.S344299]
Scarpelli, S.; Nadorff, M. R.; Bjorvatn, B.; Chung, F.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Espie, C. A.; Inoue, Y.; Matsui, K.; Merikanto, I.; Morin, C. M.; Penzel, T.;...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1270920
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