Thanks to their capability to learn generalizable descriptors directly from images, deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) seem the ideal solution to most pattern recognition problems. On the other hand, to learn the image representation, CNNs need huge sets of annotated samples that are unfeasible in many every-day scenarios. This is the case, for example, of Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems for digital pathology, where additional challenges are posed by the high variability of the cancerous tissue characteristics. In our experiments, state-of-the-art CNNs trained from scratch on histological images were less accurate and less robust to variability than a traditional machine learning framework, highlighting all the issues of fully training deep networks with limited data from real patients. To solve this problem, we designed and compared three transfer learning frameworks, leveraging CNNs pre-trained on non-medical images. This approach obtained very high accuracy, requiring much less computational resource for the training. Our findings demonstrate that transfer learning is a solution to the automated classification of histological samples and solves the problem of designing accurate and computationally-efficient CAD systems with limited training data.

Dealing with Lack of Training Data for Convolutional Neural Networks: The Case of Digital Pathology / Ponzio, Francesco; Urgese, Gianvito; Ficarra, Elisa; Di Cataldo, Santa. - In: ELECTRONICS. - ISSN 2079-9292. - 8:3(2019), pp. N/A-N/A. [10.3390/electronics8030256]

Dealing with Lack of Training Data for Convolutional Neural Networks: The Case of Digital Pathology

Elisa Ficarra;
2019

Abstract

Thanks to their capability to learn generalizable descriptors directly from images, deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) seem the ideal solution to most pattern recognition problems. On the other hand, to learn the image representation, CNNs need huge sets of annotated samples that are unfeasible in many every-day scenarios. This is the case, for example, of Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems for digital pathology, where additional challenges are posed by the high variability of the cancerous tissue characteristics. In our experiments, state-of-the-art CNNs trained from scratch on histological images were less accurate and less robust to variability than a traditional machine learning framework, highlighting all the issues of fully training deep networks with limited data from real patients. To solve this problem, we designed and compared three transfer learning frameworks, leveraging CNNs pre-trained on non-medical images. This approach obtained very high accuracy, requiring much less computational resource for the training. Our findings demonstrate that transfer learning is a solution to the automated classification of histological samples and solves the problem of designing accurate and computationally-efficient CAD systems with limited training data.
2019
8
3
N/A
N/A
Dealing with Lack of Training Data for Convolutional Neural Networks: The Case of Digital Pathology / Ponzio, Francesco; Urgese, Gianvito; Ficarra, Elisa; Di Cataldo, Santa. - In: ELECTRONICS. - ISSN 2079-9292. - 8:3(2019), pp. N/A-N/A. [10.3390/electronics8030256]
Ponzio, Francesco; Urgese, Gianvito; Ficarra, Elisa; Di Cataldo, Santa
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1240330
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