Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success.

Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors / Duskey, J. T.; Rice, K. G.. - In: AAPS PHARMSCITECH. - ISSN 1530-9932. - 15:5(2014), pp. 1345-1354. [10.1208/s12249-014-0143-6]

Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors

Duskey J. T.;
2014

Abstract

Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success.
15
5
1345
1354
Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors / Duskey, J. T.; Rice, K. G.. - In: AAPS PHARMSCITECH. - ISSN 1530-9932. - 15:5(2014), pp. 1345-1354. [10.1208/s12249-014-0143-6]
Duskey, J. T.; Rice, K. G.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Duskey-Rice2014_Article_NanoparticleLigandPresentation.pdf

non disponibili

Descrizione: Articolo principale
Tipologia: Versione dell'editore (versione pubblicata)
Dimensione 1.57 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.57 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1205667
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 25
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 25
social impact