Purpose: Increased evidence of subnormal neuropsychological functioning in new-onset childhood epilepsy has been obtained, although results are still rare and controversial. With a prospective study, we aimed to define the very early neuropsychological profile of children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), including executive functions (EF) because of their key role in learning. Additionally, we enrolled drug-naive children, with a NREM sleep frequency of discharges <85% and with a Performance Intelligence Quotient equal or superior to 85, in order to exclude additional effects on the neuropsychological functioning.Methods: Fifteen school-aged children with BECTS (mean age: 8.8 years, standard deviation [SD]: 2.4 years) and fifteen healthy children (mean age: 9.2 years, [SD]: 2.5 years) were enrolled and assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. The assessment included domain-specific standardized tests of language, EF, academic skills, visuomotor and visuospatial skills, and short-term memory. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Significant differences between patients and controls emerged with respect to 3 domains. Language was affected in color naming (p =.026), spoonerism (p =.003), and phonemic synthesis (p =.009). Executive functions appeared inadequate in the five point test with respect to the number of correct figures (p =. 003) and errors (p =.008). In the domain of academic skills, significant differences between groups emerged regarding the number of mistakes in nonword writing (p =.001), nonword reading speed (p =.027), nonword reading number of mistakes (p =. 019), and word reading errors (p =. 023).Discussion: Results showed that children with new-onset BECTS may demonstrate a range of neuropsychological dysfunctions, particularly affecting executive attention, despite a normal IQ, a low frequency of NREM sleep discharges, and the absence of drugs. These difficulties indicate a frontal dysfunction with cascading effects on language and academic skills. The inclusion of EF in the assessment battery and in the intervention since the very onset is warranted in order to avoid further and persistent academic difficulties. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Neuropsychological profile in new-onset benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS): Focusing on executive functions / Filippini, M.; Ardu, E.; Stefanelli, S.; Boni, A.; Gobbi, G.; Benso, F.. - In: EPILEPSY & BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 1525-5050. - 54:(2016), pp. 71-79. [10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.11.010]

Neuropsychological profile in new-onset benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS): Focusing on executive functions

Stefanelli S.;
2016

Abstract

Purpose: Increased evidence of subnormal neuropsychological functioning in new-onset childhood epilepsy has been obtained, although results are still rare and controversial. With a prospective study, we aimed to define the very early neuropsychological profile of children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), including executive functions (EF) because of their key role in learning. Additionally, we enrolled drug-naive children, with a NREM sleep frequency of discharges <85% and with a Performance Intelligence Quotient equal or superior to 85, in order to exclude additional effects on the neuropsychological functioning.Methods: Fifteen school-aged children with BECTS (mean age: 8.8 years, standard deviation [SD]: 2.4 years) and fifteen healthy children (mean age: 9.2 years, [SD]: 2.5 years) were enrolled and assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. The assessment included domain-specific standardized tests of language, EF, academic skills, visuomotor and visuospatial skills, and short-term memory. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Significant differences between patients and controls emerged with respect to 3 domains. Language was affected in color naming (p =.026), spoonerism (p =.003), and phonemic synthesis (p =.009). Executive functions appeared inadequate in the five point test with respect to the number of correct figures (p =. 003) and errors (p =.008). In the domain of academic skills, significant differences between groups emerged regarding the number of mistakes in nonword writing (p =.001), nonword reading speed (p =.027), nonword reading number of mistakes (p =. 019), and word reading errors (p =. 023).Discussion: Results showed that children with new-onset BECTS may demonstrate a range of neuropsychological dysfunctions, particularly affecting executive attention, despite a normal IQ, a low frequency of NREM sleep discharges, and the absence of drugs. These difficulties indicate a frontal dysfunction with cascading effects on language and academic skills. The inclusion of EF in the assessment battery and in the intervention since the very onset is warranted in order to avoid further and persistent academic difficulties. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2016
54
71
79
Neuropsychological profile in new-onset benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS): Focusing on executive functions / Filippini, M.; Ardu, E.; Stefanelli, S.; Boni, A.; Gobbi, G.; Benso, F.. - In: EPILEPSY & BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 1525-5050. - 54:(2016), pp. 71-79. [10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.11.010]
Filippini, M.; Ardu, E.; Stefanelli, S.; Boni, A.; Gobbi, G.; Benso, F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1182672
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