Introduction: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spans steatosis through nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD carries an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and liver-related events accounting for a substantial economic burden. Given that the natural history of NAFLD is critically dependent on the stage of fibrosis, non-invasively identifying the subgroup of patients at a higher risk of progressive disease is key. Areas covered: This review highlights the recent developments in the use of ultrasound-based techniques in NAFLD and their performance in predicting metabolic derangements, cardiovascular risk, and progression of liver disease, notably including diagnosis of fibrosing NASH, identification, and treatment of HCC. Expert opinion: Our ability to identify NAFLD patients and to estimate steatofibrosis with various ultrasound-based techniques has undergone tremendous progress over the last few years. However, it is more difficult to capture the inflammatory component of NASH with such ultrasound-assisted techniques. Moreover, semi-quantitative, quantitative, elastographic, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound techniques are increasingly being appreciated and made available but not all such techniques will gain success in the clinical and research area. Therefore, further research will precisely define the role of the most innovative ultrasonographic techniques, while reducing costs and increasing feasibility.

A critical appraisal of the use of ultrasound in hepatic steatosis / Ballestri, S.; Nascimbeni, F.; Lugari, S.; Lonardo, A.; Francica, G.. - In: EXPERT REVIEW OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY. - ISSN 1747-4124. - 13:7(2019), pp. 667-681. [10.1080/17474124.2019.1621164]

A critical appraisal of the use of ultrasound in hepatic steatosis

Ballestri S.;Nascimbeni F.;Lugari S.;
2019

Abstract

Introduction: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spans steatosis through nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD carries an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and liver-related events accounting for a substantial economic burden. Given that the natural history of NAFLD is critically dependent on the stage of fibrosis, non-invasively identifying the subgroup of patients at a higher risk of progressive disease is key. Areas covered: This review highlights the recent developments in the use of ultrasound-based techniques in NAFLD and their performance in predicting metabolic derangements, cardiovascular risk, and progression of liver disease, notably including diagnosis of fibrosing NASH, identification, and treatment of HCC. Expert opinion: Our ability to identify NAFLD patients and to estimate steatofibrosis with various ultrasound-based techniques has undergone tremendous progress over the last few years. However, it is more difficult to capture the inflammatory component of NASH with such ultrasound-assisted techniques. Moreover, semi-quantitative, quantitative, elastographic, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound techniques are increasingly being appreciated and made available but not all such techniques will gain success in the clinical and research area. Therefore, further research will precisely define the role of the most innovative ultrasonographic techniques, while reducing costs and increasing feasibility.
13
7
667
681
A critical appraisal of the use of ultrasound in hepatic steatosis / Ballestri, S.; Nascimbeni, F.; Lugari, S.; Lonardo, A.; Francica, G.. - In: EXPERT REVIEW OF GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY. - ISSN 1747-4124. - 13:7(2019), pp. 667-681. [10.1080/17474124.2019.1621164]
Ballestri, S.; Nascimbeni, F.; Lugari, S.; Lonardo, A.; Francica, G.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ballestri2019.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione dell'editore (versione pubblicata)
Dimensione 1.94 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.94 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1179844
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 13
  • Scopus 29
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 28
social impact