How do knowledge workers interact with their colleagues when organizations increasingly ask them to work on multiple activities, projects and working spheres simultaneously? Given the importance of social networks for individual and organizational success, in this study we explore the relationship between individual preferences for engaging in multiple tasks simultaneously (individual polychronicity), the perception of the organization’s demands in terms of engaging in multiple tasks simultaneously (organizational polychronicity), and centrality in instrumental networks. Adopting a mixed-methods approach, we collected data from knowledge professionals in a research and development (R&D) unit. Our results show that both individual and organizational polychronicity were related to network centrality. However, the effect of individual polychronicity on instrumental network centrality was stronger, especially for advice-related interactions, suggesting that individual preferences matter more when it comes to knowledge-related interactions. Not only do we link polychronicity to a previously unexplored context, that is, social networks, but we also propose the use of a cultural toolkit perspective to explain how individuals differentially make sense of organizational temporal demands. Finally, we advance research on the antecedents of network centrality and contribute to the ongoing debate on the delicate balance between structure and individual characteristics.

The relationship between polychronicity and social networks: A mixed-methods study of research and development professionals / Bertolotti, Fabiola; Mattarelli, Elisa; Dukerich, Janet. - In: HUMAN RELATIONS. - ISSN 0018-7267. - 72:10(2019), pp. 1595-1622. [10.1177/0018726718810097]

The relationship between polychronicity and social networks: A mixed-methods study of research and development professionals

Bertolotti Fabiola;Mattarelli Elisa;
2019

Abstract

How do knowledge workers interact with their colleagues when organizations increasingly ask them to work on multiple activities, projects and working spheres simultaneously? Given the importance of social networks for individual and organizational success, in this study we explore the relationship between individual preferences for engaging in multiple tasks simultaneously (individual polychronicity), the perception of the organization’s demands in terms of engaging in multiple tasks simultaneously (organizational polychronicity), and centrality in instrumental networks. Adopting a mixed-methods approach, we collected data from knowledge professionals in a research and development (R&D) unit. Our results show that both individual and organizational polychronicity were related to network centrality. However, the effect of individual polychronicity on instrumental network centrality was stronger, especially for advice-related interactions, suggesting that individual preferences matter more when it comes to knowledge-related interactions. Not only do we link polychronicity to a previously unexplored context, that is, social networks, but we also propose the use of a cultural toolkit perspective to explain how individuals differentially make sense of organizational temporal demands. Finally, we advance research on the antecedents of network centrality and contribute to the ongoing debate on the delicate balance between structure and individual characteristics.
2019
13-dic-2018
72
10
1595
1622
The relationship between polychronicity and social networks: A mixed-methods study of research and development professionals / Bertolotti, Fabiola; Mattarelli, Elisa; Dukerich, Janet. - In: HUMAN RELATIONS. - ISSN 0018-7267. - 72:10(2019), pp. 1595-1622. [10.1177/0018726718810097]
Bertolotti, Fabiola; Mattarelli, Elisa; Dukerich, Janet
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
0018726718810097.pdf

Accesso riservato

Descrizione: Articolo principale
Tipologia: Versione dell'autore revisionata e accettata per la pubblicazione
Dimensione 165.29 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
165.29 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
POST PRINT_The relationship between polychronicity and social networks.pdf

Open access

Tipologia: Versione dell'autore revisionata e accettata per la pubblicazione
Dimensione 425.76 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
425.76 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1169497
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact