The human selection of food plants cannot always have been aimed exclusively at isolating the traits typical of domesticated species today. Each phase of global change must have obliged plants and humans to cope with and develop innovative adaptive strategies. Hundreds of thousands of wild cereal seeds from the Holocene ‘green Sahara’ tell a story of cultural trajectories and environmental instability revealing that a complex suite of weediness traits were preferred by both hunter-gatherers and pastoralists. The archaeobotanical record of the Takarkori rockshelter in southwest Libya covering four millennia of human occupation in the central Sahara gives us a unique insight into long-term plant manipulation and cultivation without domestica- tion. The success of a number of millets was rooted in their invasive-opportunistic behaviour, rewarded during their coexistence with people in Africa. These wild plants were selected for features that were precious in the past but pernicious for agriculture today. Reconnecting past practices with modern farming strategies can help us to seek out the best resources for the future.

Plant behaviour from human imprints and the cultivation of wild cereals in Holocene Sahara / Mercuri, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Rita; Gallinaro, Marina; Vanin, Stefano; di Lernia, Savino. - In: NATURE PLANTS. - ISSN 2055-0278. - 4:2(2018), pp. 71-81. [10.1038/s41477-017-0098-1]

Plant behaviour from human imprints and the cultivation of wild cereals in Holocene Sahara

Anna Maria Mercuri
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Rita Fornaciari
Methodology
;
Stefano Vanin
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2018

Abstract

The human selection of food plants cannot always have been aimed exclusively at isolating the traits typical of domesticated species today. Each phase of global change must have obliged plants and humans to cope with and develop innovative adaptive strategies. Hundreds of thousands of wild cereal seeds from the Holocene ‘green Sahara’ tell a story of cultural trajectories and environmental instability revealing that a complex suite of weediness traits were preferred by both hunter-gatherers and pastoralists. The archaeobotanical record of the Takarkori rockshelter in southwest Libya covering four millennia of human occupation in the central Sahara gives us a unique insight into long-term plant manipulation and cultivation without domestica- tion. The success of a number of millets was rooted in their invasive-opportunistic behaviour, rewarded during their coexistence with people in Africa. These wild plants were selected for features that were precious in the past but pernicious for agriculture today. Reconnecting past practices with modern farming strategies can help us to seek out the best resources for the future.
29-gen-2018
4
2
71
81
Plant behaviour from human imprints and the cultivation of wild cereals in Holocene Sahara / Mercuri, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Rita; Gallinaro, Marina; Vanin, Stefano; di Lernia, Savino. - In: NATURE PLANTS. - ISSN 2055-0278. - 4:2(2018), pp. 71-81. [10.1038/s41477-017-0098-1]
Mercuri, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Rita; Gallinaro, Marina; Vanin, Stefano; di Lernia, Savino
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
mercuri2018.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione dell'editore (versione pubblicata)
Dimensione 2.35 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.35 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
PRE_PRINT_Mercuri_Lernia_text_legends2_last_submission.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Pre-print dell'autore (bozza pre referaggio)
Dimensione 1.33 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.33 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1153032
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 10
  • Scopus 39
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 36
social impact