Technological progress leads to technological obsolescence and inevitably tends to obliterate its own past. It widens the gap between those who know and invent, and those who merely purchase and use instruments and appliances with no idea of ‘what’s inside’ them. The latter have little or no idea of the cultural processes which led to the creation of such instruments. As a result, not only is technology disconnected from scientific knowledge, but collective memory and cultural heritage are lost. The link between generations is weakened, as if the past were some sort of ladder to be kicked away after use. The sense of human cooperation and effort, of inquiring and learning through trial and error is replaced by a ‘spoilt child syndrome’. Technological information should not be divorced from scientific education or from history and the humanities. The teaching of history can complement and enliven scientific instruction, and induce a sense of common heritage.

Heritage vs consumption, or the 'spoilt child syndrome', and how the humanities can remedy it / LA VERGATA, Antonello. - CD-ROM. - (2016). ((Intervento presentato al convegno Heritage 20016, 5th International Conference on Heritage and Sustainable Development tenutosi a Lisbona nel 12-15 luglio 2016.

Heritage vs consumption, or the 'spoilt child syndrome', and how the humanities can remedy it

LA VERGATA, Antonello
2016-01-01

Abstract

Technological progress leads to technological obsolescence and inevitably tends to obliterate its own past. It widens the gap between those who know and invent, and those who merely purchase and use instruments and appliances with no idea of ‘what’s inside’ them. The latter have little or no idea of the cultural processes which led to the creation of such instruments. As a result, not only is technology disconnected from scientific knowledge, but collective memory and cultural heritage are lost. The link between generations is weakened, as if the past were some sort of ladder to be kicked away after use. The sense of human cooperation and effort, of inquiring and learning through trial and error is replaced by a ‘spoilt child syndrome’. Technological information should not be divorced from scientific education or from history and the humanities. The teaching of history can complement and enliven scientific instruction, and induce a sense of common heritage.
Heritage 20016, 5th International Conference on Heritage and Sustainable Development
Lisbona
12-15 luglio 2016
LA VERGATA, Antonello
Heritage vs consumption, or the 'spoilt child syndrome', and how the humanities can remedy it / LA VERGATA, Antonello. - CD-ROM. - (2016). ((Intervento presentato al convegno Heritage 20016, 5th International Conference on Heritage and Sustainable Development tenutosi a Lisbona nel 12-15 luglio 2016.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1109228
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