OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern of executive dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and to determine the brain areas associated with executive dysfunction in these illnesses. METHOD: We administered the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS), a collection of standardized executive function tests, to 51 patients with behavioral-variant FTD and 50 patients with CBS. We also performed a discriminant analysis on the D-KEFS to determine which executive function tests best distinguished the clinical diagnoses of FTD and CBS. Finally, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to determine regional gray matter volume loss associated with executive dysfunction. RESULTS: Patients with FTD and patients with CBS showed executive dysfunction greater than memory dysfunction. Executive function was better preserved in the patients with CBS than the patients with FTD with the exception of tests that required motor, visuospatial ability, or both. In patients with CBS, dorsal frontal and parietal and temporal-parietal cortex was associated with executive function. In FTD, tests with a language component (Verbal Fluency) were associated with left perisylvian cortex, sorting with the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and reasoning (the Twenty Questions task) with the left anterior frontal cortex. The Twenty Questions test best distinguished the clinical diagnoses of CBS and FTD. CONCLUSIONS: The neuroanatomic findings (especially in frontotemporal dementia [FTD]) agree with the previous literature on this topic. Patients with FTD and patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) show disparate performance on higher-order executive functions, especially the Twenty Questions test. It may be difficult to distinguish motor and visuospatial ability from executive function in patients with CBS using tests with significant motor and visuospatial demands such as Trail Making. © 2009 by AAN Enterprises, Inc.

Executive dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome / Huey, E. D.; Goveia, E. N.; Paviol, S.; Pardini, M.; Krueger, F.; Zamboni, Giovanna; Tierney, M. C.; Wassermann, E. M.; Grafman, J.. - In: NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 0028-3878. - 72:(2009), pp. 453-459. [10.1212/01.wnl.0000341781.39164.26]

Executive dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome

ZAMBONI, Giovanna;
2009

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern of executive dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and to determine the brain areas associated with executive dysfunction in these illnesses. METHOD: We administered the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS), a collection of standardized executive function tests, to 51 patients with behavioral-variant FTD and 50 patients with CBS. We also performed a discriminant analysis on the D-KEFS to determine which executive function tests best distinguished the clinical diagnoses of FTD and CBS. Finally, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to determine regional gray matter volume loss associated with executive dysfunction. RESULTS: Patients with FTD and patients with CBS showed executive dysfunction greater than memory dysfunction. Executive function was better preserved in the patients with CBS than the patients with FTD with the exception of tests that required motor, visuospatial ability, or both. In patients with CBS, dorsal frontal and parietal and temporal-parietal cortex was associated with executive function. In FTD, tests with a language component (Verbal Fluency) were associated with left perisylvian cortex, sorting with the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and reasoning (the Twenty Questions task) with the left anterior frontal cortex. The Twenty Questions test best distinguished the clinical diagnoses of CBS and FTD. CONCLUSIONS: The neuroanatomic findings (especially in frontotemporal dementia [FTD]) agree with the previous literature on this topic. Patients with FTD and patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) show disparate performance on higher-order executive functions, especially the Twenty Questions test. It may be difficult to distinguish motor and visuospatial ability from executive function in patients with CBS using tests with significant motor and visuospatial demands such as Trail Making. © 2009 by AAN Enterprises, Inc.
72
453
459
Executive dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome / Huey, E. D.; Goveia, E. N.; Paviol, S.; Pardini, M.; Krueger, F.; Zamboni, Giovanna; Tierney, M. C.; Wassermann, E. M.; Grafman, J.. - In: NEUROLOGY. - ISSN 0028-3878. - 72:(2009), pp. 453-459. [10.1212/01.wnl.0000341781.39164.26]
Huey, E. D.; Goveia, E. N.; Paviol, S.; Pardini, M.; Krueger, F.; Zamboni, Giovanna; Tierney, M. C.; Wassermann, E. M.; Grafman, J.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

Licenza Creative Commons
I metadati presenti in IRIS UNIMORE sono rilasciati con licenza Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal, mentre i file delle pubblicazioni sono rilasciati con licenza Attribuzione 4.0 Internazionale (CC BY 4.0), salvo diversa indicazione.
In caso di violazione di copyright, contattare Supporto Iris

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11380/1108838
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 32
  • Scopus 71
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 66
social impact