Diffusion imaging is a promising marker of microstructural damage in neurodegenerative disorders, but interpretation of its relationship with underlying neuropathology can be complex. Here, we examined both volumetric and brain microstructure abnormalities in 13 amnestic patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), who progressed to probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) no earlier than 2 years after baseline scanning, inorder to focus on early, and hence more sensitive, imaging markers. We compared them to 22 stable amnestic MCI patients with similar cognitive performance and episodic memory impairment but who did not show progression of symptoms for at least 3 years. Significant group differences were mainly found in the volume and microstructure of the left hippocampus, while white matter group differences were also found in the body of the fornix, left fimbria, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Diffusion index abnormalities in the SLF were the sign of a subtle microstructural injury not detected by standard atrophy measures in the corresponding gray matter regions. The microstructural measure obtained in the left hippocampus using diffusion imaging showed the mostsubstantial differences between the two groups and was the best single predictor of future progression to AD. Anoptimal prediction model (91% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, 96% specificity) was obtained by combining MRI measures and CSF protein biomarkers. These results highlight the benefit of using the information of brain microstructural damage, in addition to traditional gray matter volume, to detectearly, subtle abnormalities in MCI prior to clinical progression to probable AD and, in combination with CSF markers, to accurately predict such progression. © 2013 the authors.

Brain microstructure reveals early abnormalities more than two years prior to clinical progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease / Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Menke, Ricarda A. L.; Gass, Achim; Monsch, Andreas U.; Rao, Anil; Whitcher, Brandon; Zamboni, Giovanna; Matthews, Paul M.; Sollberger, Marc; Smith, Stephen. - In: THE JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0270-6474. - 33:(2013), pp. 2147-2155. [10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4437-12.2013]

Brain microstructure reveals early abnormalities more than two years prior to clinical progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease

ZAMBONI, Giovanna;
2013

Abstract

Diffusion imaging is a promising marker of microstructural damage in neurodegenerative disorders, but interpretation of its relationship with underlying neuropathology can be complex. Here, we examined both volumetric and brain microstructure abnormalities in 13 amnestic patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), who progressed to probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) no earlier than 2 years after baseline scanning, inorder to focus on early, and hence more sensitive, imaging markers. We compared them to 22 stable amnestic MCI patients with similar cognitive performance and episodic memory impairment but who did not show progression of symptoms for at least 3 years. Significant group differences were mainly found in the volume and microstructure of the left hippocampus, while white matter group differences were also found in the body of the fornix, left fimbria, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Diffusion index abnormalities in the SLF were the sign of a subtle microstructural injury not detected by standard atrophy measures in the corresponding gray matter regions. The microstructural measure obtained in the left hippocampus using diffusion imaging showed the mostsubstantial differences between the two groups and was the best single predictor of future progression to AD. Anoptimal prediction model (91% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, 96% specificity) was obtained by combining MRI measures and CSF protein biomarkers. These results highlight the benefit of using the information of brain microstructural damage, in addition to traditional gray matter volume, to detectearly, subtle abnormalities in MCI prior to clinical progression to probable AD and, in combination with CSF markers, to accurately predict such progression. © 2013 the authors.
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2155
Brain microstructure reveals early abnormalities more than two years prior to clinical progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease / Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Menke, Ricarda A. L.; Gass, Achim; Monsch, Andreas U.; Rao, Anil; Whitcher, Brandon; Zamboni, Giovanna; Matthews, Paul M.; Sollberger, Marc; Smith, Stephen. - In: THE JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0270-6474. - 33:(2013), pp. 2147-2155. [10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4437-12.2013]
Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Menke, Ricarda A. L.; Gass, Achim; Monsch, Andreas U.; Rao, Anil; Whitcher, Brandon; Zamboni, Giovanna; Matthews, Paul M.; Sollberger, Marc; Smith, Stephen
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1108803
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