By investigating the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and bone mineral density (BMD) in a large cohort of HIV-infected men, estradiol was associated with BMD, relative estrogen deficiency being involved in bone loss in men with hypogonadism, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and BMD in a large cohort of HIV-infected men. METHODS: We investigated biochemical, hormonal parameters, and BMD in 1204 HIV-infected men (age 45.64 ± 7.33 years) participating in a cross-sectional, observational study. Among other parameters, the main outcome measures were serum total testosterone and estradiol, gonadotropins, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], parathormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorous, femoral, and lumbar BMD. RESULTS: In men with HIV, the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia is 15.1 and 63.2 % with 25(OH)D insufficiency being very common (60.1 %). After age adjustment, BMD is positively associated with estradiol, but not testosterone, at linear (p < 0.001) and stepwise (p < 0.05) multiple regression. Lumbar BMD significantly increases across the estradiol quartiles but not among testosterone quartiles. Femoral and lumbar BMD are significantly higher in men with estradiol ≥ 27 pg/mL than in those with estradiol <27 pg/mL. Apart from estradiol, only age, calcium, and BMI predict BMD at stepwise linear multiple regression, but the strength of this association is weak. CONCLUSIONS: Estradiol, but not testosterone, is associated with BMD in HIV-infected men and exerts a protective role on bone especially when it is above 27 pg/mL. Relative estrogen deficiency is a potential mechanism involved in bone loss in hypogonadal HIV-infected men, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. Finally, reduced BMD in young-to-middle-aged HIV-infected men might be considered a peculiar hallmark of HIV infection due to its relevant prevalence, representing one of the several pieces composing the complicated puzzle of premature aging related to HIV infection.

Summary: By investigating the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and bone mineral density (BMD) in a large cohort of HIV-infected men, estradiol was associated with BMD, relative estrogen deficiency being involved in bone loss in men with hypogonadism, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and BMD in a large cohort of HIV-infected men. Methods: We investigated biochemical, hormonal parameters, and BMD in 1204 HIV-infected men (age 45.64 ± 7.33 years) participating in a cross-sectional, observational study. Among other parameters, the main outcome measures were serum total testosterone and estradiol, gonadotropins, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], parathormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorous, femoral, and lumbar BMD. Results: In men with HIV, the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia is 15.1 and 63.2 % with 25(OH)D insufficiency being very common (60.1 %). After age adjustment, BMD is positively associated with estradiol, but not testosterone, at linear (p < 0.001) and stepwise (p < 0.05) multiple regression. Lumbar BMD significantly increases across the estradiol quartiles but not among testosterone quartiles. Femoral and lumbar BMD are significantly higher in men with estradiol ≥ 27 pg/mL than in those with estradiol <27 pg/mL. Apart from estradiol, only age, calcium, and BMI predict BMD at stepwise linear multiple regression, but the strength of this association is weak. Conclusions: Estradiol, but not testosterone, is associated with BMD in HIV-infected men and exerts a protective role on bone especially when it is above 27 pg/mL. Relative estrogen deficiency is a potential mechanism involved in bone loss in hypogonadal HIV-infected men, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. Finally, reduced BMD in young-to-middle-aged HIV-infected men might be considered a peculiar hallmark of HIV infection due to its relevant prevalence, representing one of the several pieces composing the complicated puzzle of premature aging related to HIV infection.

Serum total estradiol, but not testosterone is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected men: a cross-sectional, observational study / Santi, Daniele; Madeo, Bruno; Carli, Federica; Zona, Stefano; Brigante, Giulia; Vescini, F.; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo. - In: OSTEOPOROSIS INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0937-941X. - STAMPA. - 27:(2016), pp. 1103-1114. [10.1007/s00198-015-3383-8]

Serum total estradiol, but not testosterone is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected men: a cross-sectional, observational study

SANTI, Daniele;MADEO, Bruno;CARLI, FEDERICA;ZONA, Stefano;BRIGANTE, Giulia;GUARALDI, Giovanni;ROCHIRA, Vincenzo
2016

Abstract

By investigating the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and bone mineral density (BMD) in a large cohort of HIV-infected men, estradiol was associated with BMD, relative estrogen deficiency being involved in bone loss in men with hypogonadism, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum testosterone, estradiol, and BMD in a large cohort of HIV-infected men. METHODS: We investigated biochemical, hormonal parameters, and BMD in 1204 HIV-infected men (age 45.64 ± 7.33 years) participating in a cross-sectional, observational study. Among other parameters, the main outcome measures were serum total testosterone and estradiol, gonadotropins, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], parathormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorous, femoral, and lumbar BMD. RESULTS: In men with HIV, the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia is 15.1 and 63.2 % with 25(OH)D insufficiency being very common (60.1 %). After age adjustment, BMD is positively associated with estradiol, but not testosterone, at linear (p < 0.001) and stepwise (p < 0.05) multiple regression. Lumbar BMD significantly increases across the estradiol quartiles but not among testosterone quartiles. Femoral and lumbar BMD are significantly higher in men with estradiol ≥ 27 pg/mL than in those with estradiol <27 pg/mL. Apart from estradiol, only age, calcium, and BMI predict BMD at stepwise linear multiple regression, but the strength of this association is weak. CONCLUSIONS: Estradiol, but not testosterone, is associated with BMD in HIV-infected men and exerts a protective role on bone especially when it is above 27 pg/mL. Relative estrogen deficiency is a potential mechanism involved in bone loss in hypogonadal HIV-infected men, in addition to all HIV-related factors. Increased aromatization in adipose tissue does not counteract HIV-related bone loss. Finally, reduced BMD in young-to-middle-aged HIV-infected men might be considered a peculiar hallmark of HIV infection due to its relevant prevalence, representing one of the several pieces composing the complicated puzzle of premature aging related to HIV infection.
28-ott-2015
27
1103
1114
Serum total estradiol, but not testosterone is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected men: a cross-sectional, observational study / Santi, Daniele; Madeo, Bruno; Carli, Federica; Zona, Stefano; Brigante, Giulia; Vescini, F.; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo. - In: OSTEOPOROSIS INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 0937-941X. - STAMPA. - 27:(2016), pp. 1103-1114. [10.1007/s00198-015-3383-8]
Santi, Daniele; Madeo, Bruno; Carli, Federica; Zona, Stefano; Brigante, Giulia; Vescini, F.; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1103526
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