Maintenance of normal intracellular redox status plays an important role in regulating many physiological processes. The cellular oxidation and reduction environment is influenced by the production and removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Unbalanced levels of ROS are a common characteristic of many acute and chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, acute liver and renal failure, and neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases and strokes. On the other hand, in the last years it has been shown that not only are ROS detrimental to cells but at physiological level they regulate a myriad of cellular processes including transcription regulation and cell signaling. Several reports support the hypothesis that cellular ROS levels could function as “second messengers.” The second messenger properties of ROS are believed to activate signaling pathways by regulating kinases, phosphatases, transcription factors, or ion channels to coordinate the final response of the cell. Understanding the crosstalk between signaling, ROS, and cell homeostasis is fundamental for understanding redox biology and disease pathogenesis.

Redox signaling in degenerative diseases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications / Angeloni, Cristina; Maraldi, Tullia; Vauzour, David. - In: BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 2314-6133. - STAMPA. - 2014:(2014), pp. 245761-245762. [10.1155/2014/245761]

Redox signaling in degenerative diseases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications

MARALDI, Tullia;
2014

Abstract

Maintenance of normal intracellular redox status plays an important role in regulating many physiological processes. The cellular oxidation and reduction environment is influenced by the production and removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Unbalanced levels of ROS are a common characteristic of many acute and chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, acute liver and renal failure, and neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases and strokes. On the other hand, in the last years it has been shown that not only are ROS detrimental to cells but at physiological level they regulate a myriad of cellular processes including transcription regulation and cell signaling. Several reports support the hypothesis that cellular ROS levels could function as “second messengers.” The second messenger properties of ROS are believed to activate signaling pathways by regulating kinases, phosphatases, transcription factors, or ion channels to coordinate the final response of the cell. Understanding the crosstalk between signaling, ROS, and cell homeostasis is fundamental for understanding redox biology and disease pathogenesis.
2014
245761
245762
Redox signaling in degenerative diseases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications / Angeloni, Cristina; Maraldi, Tullia; Vauzour, David. - In: BIOMED RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL. - ISSN 2314-6133. - STAMPA. - 2014:(2014), pp. 245761-245762. [10.1155/2014/245761]
Angeloni, Cristina; Maraldi, Tullia; Vauzour, David
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11380/1063154
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